Oil paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ Mon, 09 May 2022 12:19:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cuimingda.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-25T191724.119-150x150.png Oil paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ 32 32 Oil paintings by Fernand Toussaint and Andre Gisson are in the Crescent City Estates Auction May 13-14 https://cuimingda.com/oil-paintings-by-fernand-toussaint-and-andre-gisson-are-in-the-crescent-city-estates-auction-may-13-14/ Mon, 02 May 2022 19:26:37 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/oil-paintings-by-fernand-toussaint-and-andre-gisson-are-in-the-crescent-city-estates-auction-may-13-14/ Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956), artist signed lower right, 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000 – $5,000).Crescent City Auction Gallery NEW ORLEANS, La. – Gorgeous original oil paintings by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956) and André Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003), six fine […]]]>

Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956), artist signed lower right, 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000 – $5,000).
Crescent City Auction Gallery

NEW ORLEANS, La. – Gorgeous original oil paintings by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956) and André Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003), six fine pieces of matte-glazed Newcomb pottery, a collection of bronzes (including an excellent example of Harry Jackson, American, 1924-2011), magnificent sterling silver (including a large pair of urns covered in .800 German silver) and a selection of six gold coins will all be part of the Important May Estates at the Crescent City Auction Gallery. Auction, scheduled for the weekend of May 13 and 14.

The auction will be held online and in the gallery at 1330 Saint Charles Avenue in New Orleans. Departure times are 10 a.m. Central Time on both days. More than 900 lots will be auctioned, in categories including French, English and American period furniture, original works of art by renowned local and regional artists, china, pottery, bronzes, silverware, mirrors and decorative items.

Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a lady with a fan by Fernand Toussaint is the artist signed lower right and measures 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000-$5,000). The oil on canvas depiction of our Lady by Andre Gisson (a pseudonym; real name is Anders Gittelson), is signed lower right, and measures 17½ inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,000-$2,000).

Harry Jackson’s remarkable patinated bronze sculpture, titled Silent partners (1973) is a key lot in the bronze collection. It stands 14 inches tall and is signed and dated on the entire base (estimated between $2,000 and $4,000). The large pair of .800 silver-covered German urns, from the late 19th century, stand 17 ½ inches tall and weigh a total of 120.45 troy ounces. (estimated between $1,500 and $2,500).

Also in the silver category, a 141-piece set of sterling flatware from International, in the “Continental” pattern, produced in 1936 and weighing 209.6 troy ounces, is expected to fetch $4,000 to $6,000. The mirrors will be led by a 20th century French gilt and gesso Louis XVI style mirror, an impressive 72 inches high by 40 inches wide. He should make between $800 and $1,200.

Oil on canvas depicting Notre Dame by Andre Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003 (real name: Anders Gittelson), signed lower right, 17½ ​​inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,000-$2,000).
Crescent City Auction Gallery

Paintings by renowned regional artists will boast an approximately 2002 Abstract by George Bauer Dunbar (La., b. 1927), signed center right, 23 ¾ inches by 42 inches (est. $10,000-$15,000); a 1968 acrylic on masonite Rooftop Stage by Noel Rockmore (New Orleans, 1928-1995), signed and dated lower right, 17½ ​​inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,500-$2,500); and an oil on panel early 20th work signed titled moonlit bayou by Will Ousley (La., 1866-1853) (est. $1,000-$2,000).

From England, an oil on canvas painting by British artist Alan Wolton, titled aspen row (1985), signed and dated lower right and titled verso, 23 ¾ inches by 29 ½ inches, should fetch $1,200 to $1,800.

French furniture, always a hit at Crescent City auctions, will feature these beautiful pieces:

  • A carved walnut sideboard in the 19th century French Louis XV provincial style, measuring 38 ¾ inches high by 93 inches wide by 24 inches deep (estimated $1,500-$2,500).
  • An early 19th century French provincial carved walnut double-door armoire, measuring 95 inches high by 72 inches wide by 27 inches deep (est. $800-$1,200).
  • A late 19th century French Louis XV style inlaid domed marble top chest of drawers, 34 inches high by 51 inches wide (estimate $800-$1,200).

Equally beautiful but not-from-France furniture will include a 20th-century gilt and polychrome Italian console table, 62 inches wide (est. $1,000-$2,000); a late 19th-century American Revival oak 13-piece suite in the style of RJ Horner (est. $2,000-$4,000); a 20th century English carved cherry Georgian leather desk, 62 inches wide by 35 ½ inches deep (est. $1,000-$1,500); and a large c.1860 carved walnut Gothic double-door armoire, possibly New Orleans, 91 ½ inches high by 64 inches wide (est. $800-$1,200).

A collection of bronzes includes an excellent example by Harry Jackson (American, 1924-2011), titled Silent Pardners (1973), 14 inches high, signed and dated (est. $2,000-$4,000).
Crescent City Auction Gallery

A large English fine china and brass figurine of a knight on horseback by Richard Sefton (1987), #4 by 15, 24 inches high and contained in a perspex case on a custom carved mahogany stand, should end at $1,200-$1,800. Also on sale will be a late 19th-century gilt bronze and French crystal 8-light chandelier, 29 inches tall and 29 inches in diameter (est. $800-$1,200).

Porcelain offerings will include a 19th-century Royal Vienna painted porcelain charger, 16 inches in diameter, in a gilt shadowbox frame (est. $1,000-$2,000); a set of four 19th century Meissen porcelain trimmings, measuring 22 inches high and 11 inches in diameter (estimated between $1,000 and $2,000); and a late 19th-century gilt-bronze mounted Sèvres porcelain mailbox and inkwell (est. $1,000-$2,000).

Previews of the exhibition will take place daily, May 4-12 (except Saturdays and Sundays), at the Crescent City Gallery, located at 1330 Saint Charles Avenue in downtown New Orleans.

Internet auctions will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and BidSquare.com. Remote and telephone bids will be accepted until 1:00 p.m. Central Time the day before the auction. A 25% buyer’s commission will be applied internally (3% cashback or check). A printed catalog is available; call 504-529-5057 or email info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com.

Crescent City Auction Gallery is always looking for quality submissions for future auctions. To consign a unique item, estate, or collection, you can call them at (504) 529-5057; or, you can email info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com. All phone calls and emails are confidential.

To learn more about Crescent City Auction Gallery and the Important May Estates auction scheduled for the weekend of May 13-14, visit www.crescentcityauctiongallery.com.

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Oil paintings by Toussaint and Gisson, Newcomb Pottery, gold coins, bronzes, etc. at the Crescent City auction on May 13-14 https://cuimingda.com/oil-paintings-by-toussaint-and-gisson-newcomb-pottery-gold-coins-bronzes-etc-at-the-crescent-city-auction-on-may-13-14/ Mon, 02 May 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/oil-paintings-by-toussaint-and-gisson-newcomb-pottery-gold-coins-bronzes-etc-at-the-crescent-city-auction-on-may-13-14/ Oil on canvas depicting Notre Dame by Andre Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003 (real name: Anders Gittelson), signed lower right, 17½ ​​inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,000-$2,000). Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956), artist signed lower right, 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000 […]]]>

Oil on canvas depicting Notre Dame by Andre Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003 (real name: Anders Gittelson), signed lower right, 17½ ​​inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,000-$2,000).

Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956), artist signed lower right (est. $3,000-$5,000).

Early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956), artist signed lower right, 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000 – $5,000).

A collection of bronzes includes an excellent example by Harry Jackson (American, 1924-2011), titled Silent Pardners (1973), 14 inches tall, signed (est. $2,000-$4,000).

A collection of bronzes includes an excellent example by Harry Jackson (American, 1924-2011), titled Silent Pardners (1973), 14 inches high, signed and dated (est. $2,000-$4,000).

Newcomb Pottery fans and collectors are in luck: the auction includes six matt glazed examples.

Newcomb Pottery fans and collectors are in luck: the auction includes six beautiful pieces of matt glazed examples.

A selection of six gold coins will be offered at the Crescent City Auction Gallery's Important May Estates auction on May 13-14.

A selection of six gold coins will be offered at the Crescent City Auction Gallery’s Important May Estates auction, scheduled for the weekend of May 13-14.

The auction will also include French, English and American period furniture, china, pottery, silverware, mirrors and decorative items – over 900 lots in total.

NEW ORLEANS, LA, UNITED STATES, May 2, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Magnificent original oil paintings by Fernand Toussaint (French/Belgian, 1873-1956) and Andre Gisson (American/French, 1929-2003), six fine pieces of matte-glazed Newcomb pottery, a collection of bronzes (including an excellent example of Harry Jackson, American, 1924-2011), magnificent sterling silver (including a large pair of .800 German silver-covered urns) and a selection of six gold pieces will all be part of the Crescent City Auction Gallery’s Important May Estates auction, scheduled for the weekend of May 13-14.

The auction will be held online and in the gallery at 1330 Saint Charles Avenue in New Orleans. Departure times are 10 a.m. Central Time on both days. More than 900 lots will be auctioned, in categories including French, English and American period furniture, original works of art by renowned local and regional artists, china, pottery, bronzes, silverware, mirrors and decorative objects.

The early 20th century oil on canvas Portrait of a Lady with a Fan by Fernand Toussaint is signed by the artist on the lower right and measures 23 inches by 19 ¼ inches (est. $3,000-$5,000 ). The oil-on-canvas depiction of Notre Dame by Andre Gisson (a pseudonym; real name is Anders Gittelson), is signed lower right, and measures 17½ inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,000 – 2 $000).

The remarkable patinated bronze sculpture by Harry Jackson, entitled Silent Pardners (1973) is a key lot in the bronze collection. It stands 14 inches tall and is signed and dated on the entire base (estimated between $2,000 and $4,000). The large pair of .800 silver-covered German urns, from the late 19th century, stand 17 ½ inches tall and weigh a total of 120.45 troy ounces. (estimated between $1,500 and $2,500).

Also in the silver category, a 141-piece set of sterling flatware from International, in the “Continental” pattern, produced in 1936 and weighing 209.6 troy ounces, is expected to fetch $4,000-6,000. The mirrors will be led by a 20th century French gilt and gesso Louis XVI style mirror, an impressive 72 inches high by 40 inches wide. He should make between $800 and $1,200.

Paintings by noted regional artists will include a circa 2002 abstract by George Bauer Dunbar (La., b. 1927), signed center right, 23 ¾ inches by 42 inches (est. $10,000-$15,000) ; a 1968 acrylic on Masonite Rooftop Scene by Noel Rockmore (New Orleans, 1928-1995), signed and dated lower right, 17½ ​​inches by 23½ inches (est. $1,500-$2,500); and an early 20th century signed oil on panel titled Moonlight Bayou by Will Ousley (La., 1866-1853) (est. $1,000-$2,000).

From England, an oil on canvas by British artist Alan Wolton, titled Aspen Row (1985), signed and dated lower right and titled verso, 23 ¾ inches by 29 ½ inches, is expected to cost $1,200 – 1 $800.

French furniture, always a hit at Crescent City auctions, will feature these beautiful pieces:

• A carved walnut sideboard in the 19th century French Louis XV provincial style, measuring 38 ¾ inches high by 93 inches wide by 24 inches deep (estimated between $1,500 and $2,500).
• An early 19th century French provincial carved walnut double-door armoire, measuring 95 inches high, 72 inches wide, and 27 inches deep (est. $800-$1,200).
• A late 19th century French Louis XV style inlaid domed marble chest of drawers, 34 inches high by 51 inches wide (estimate between $800 and $1,200).

Equally beautiful but not-from-France furniture will include a 20th-century gilt and polychrome Italian console table, 62 inches wide (est. $1,000-$2,000); a late 19th-century American Revival oak 13-piece suite in the style of RJ Horner (est. $2,000-$4,000); a 20th century English carved cherry Georgian leather desk, 62 inches wide by 35 ½ inches deep (est. $1,000-$1,500); and a large c.1860 carved walnut Gothic double-door armoire, possibly New Orleans, 91 ½ inches high by 64 inches wide (est. $800-$1,200).

A large English fine china and brass figurine of a knight on horseback by Richard Sefton (1987), #4 by 15, 24 inches high and contained in a perspex case on a custom carved mahogany stand, should end at $1,200-$1,800. Also on sale will be a late 19th-century gilt bronze and French crystal 8-light chandelier, 29 inches tall and 29 inches in diameter (est. $800-$1,200).

Porcelain offerings will include a 19th-century Royal Vienna painted porcelain charger, 16 inches in diameter, in a gilt shadowbox frame (est. $1,000-$2,000); a set of four 19th century Meissen porcelain trimmings, measuring 22 inches high and 11 inches in diameter (estimated between $1,000 and $2,000); and a late 19th-century gilt-bronze mounted Sèvres porcelain mailbox and inkwell (est. $1,000-$2,000).

Previews of the exhibition will take place daily, May 4-12 (except Saturdays and Sundays), at the Crescent City Gallery, located at 1330 Saint Charles Avenue in downtown New Orleans.

Internet auctions will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and BidSquare.com. Remote and telephone bids will be accepted until 1:00 p.m. Central Time the day before the auction. A 25% buyer’s commission will be applied internally (3% cashback or check). A printed catalog is available; call 504-529-5057 or email info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com.

Crescent City Auction Gallery is always looking for quality submissions for future auctions. To consign a unique item, estate, or collection, you can call them at (504) 529-5057; or, you can email info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com. All phone calls and emails are confidential.

To learn more about Crescent City Auction Gallery and the Important May Estates auction scheduled for the weekend of May 13-14, visit www.crescentcityauctiongallery.com.

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Sully Hildebrand
Crescent City Auction Gallery
+1 504-529-5057
write to us here

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Laura Raborn captures the human spirit of Breckenridge with oil paintings https://cuimingda.com/laura-raborn-captures-the-human-spirit-of-breckenridge-with-oil-paintings/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 16:29:14 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/laura-raborn-captures-the-human-spirit-of-breckenridge-with-oil-paintings/ Laura Raborn from Arkansas is the latest artist-in-residence at Breckenridge Creative Arts. This is his first residence in Colorado.Tripp Fay/For the Summit Daily News Laura Raborn has been an artist most of her life. Some of the earliest art she ever made was during her childhood family trips to the Bahamas. “I would go to […]]]>

Laura Raborn from Arkansas is the latest artist-in-residence at Breckenridge Creative Arts. This is his first residence in Colorado.
Tripp Fay/For the Summit Daily News

Laura Raborn has been an artist most of her life. Some of the earliest art she ever made was during her childhood family trips to the Bahamas.

“I would go to the cemetery on these islands and draw and paint the headstones which were usually covered with wild growth and beautiful plants and all that nature beyond these symbols of man’s existence,” Raborn said.

Decades later, she got married in the Bahamas and now has a gallery on Harbor Island. But it was not an easy path.



Growing up in Little Rock, Arkansas, Raborn attended Rollins College in Florida and worked in marketing and advertising in his twenties while taking night classes at the Arkansas Arts Center. She returned to Arkansas for college, but ended up starting a family. Raborn quit her job to care for her two daughters, but was able to explore art in her spare time.

Raborn, completing a month-long residency with Breckenridge Creative Arts, said it was a risky and difficult decision due to societal pressures to pursue professions like a lawyer or a doctor, but she said she had feel like you don’t have a choice.



“I really wanted to find a way to work part-time and do something I love and be a mom,” Raborn said.

Raborn focused on pottery for a while, but an arm injury brought her back to painting and drawing, which she found easier on the body.

It wasn’t until she was 40 that she finally went to graduate school in Little Rock. She said the arts community there was tough as opposed to more established places. However, Raborn said it was improving and she had seen more opportunities over the past five years.

“It was amazing. It really changed and propelled my thinking about what two-dimensional art is even for,” Raborn said. “It helped me understand the concepts behind creating art.”

Raborn also began to increasingly explore the art world beyond Arkansas with his children away from home for college. She was able to travel to give workshops and attend residencies in ways she couldn’t before. Some of these included teaching in Colorado Springs, Crested Butte, and Telluride.

No matter where she makes art, Raborn uses oil paint and mixed media to tell stories. Most of her figurative portraits are based on real people, but she will boil them down to something relatable for everyone. She’ll take a photo and paint it, but rather than copying an identical person, she uses layers to hide certain information and draw people in, letting the viewer make up their own mind on the subject.

“I don’t paint biographically,” Raborn said. “I don’t paint a person to try to tell their whole story. I have to accept that some of the information I feel and learn about a person will not be communicated through a painting. But my hope is that something a little more universal is communicated through each painting.

Laura Raborn mainly works in oil paint and mixed techniques. She tries to capture what makes a person unique and abstract the image to have a universal impact.
Tripp Fay/For the Summit Daily News

At one point, her mixed media work focused on current affairs and social justice, depicting images such as Dr. Anthony Fauci and women in dresses from “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Raborn knows that art is important to critique and call for change, but she didn’t want her pieces to always be heavy, dark and negative. It was then that she began to integrate the people she had met on her travels while listening to their stories.

Having attended Little Rock Central High School – famous for its integration and Little Rock Nine – Raborn uses his outlook on life to highlight what makes a person both unique and similar.

“It all feeds into who I am as a person and also the artwork,” Raborn said.

Like these tombstones in the Bahamas, Raborn always uses nature in art. Paint and charcoal are some of her favorite mediums, but she also likes to create different layers with stencils to push characters into space. She loves how plants and other natural elements can be hand-cut into hard-edged stencils that contrast with loose lines of figures.

“This combination is unexpected, and they’re so different from each other that they create a kind of tension or energy,” Raborn said. “It keeps it from being a traditional portrait in a pretty surprising way, and I really like that.”

Stencils and other methods are customizable, and Raborn is passionate about imparting that individuality to her students. She teaches collage, image transfer, drawing and applications such as printing, scratching and sanding which are alternatives to brush painting.

In Breckenridge, Raborn’s workshops and open studios allowed him to connect with the community. She believes everyone has the potential to make art in some way. All it takes is learning the techniques and practicing them, she says.

“At the end of a workshop, people are usually really happy with what they’ve learned in a short time,” Raborn said, adding that local events have seen a steady stream of attendees. “It’s just a matter of learning these tricks, not being too hard on yourself to try them with an open and free attitude.”

This practice goes both ways, as it reminds Raborn of the skills he needs to perfect.

“Teaching elevated my craft,” Raborn said. “…If I could imagine the last eight years of art and not teaching, I don’t think art would be where it is.”

This residency was her first in Colorado, and notably different from those she has done in the past. Others were shorter or focused more on the studio experience. Some also had other residents Raborn could meet and interact with. Although she is alone this time, she makes the most of it.

An innovative aspect of this residency is the creation of the hashtags #BreckGratitude and #BreckThanks. During his stay, Raborn created a public gratitude journal on social media and invites others to join in contributing. She is grateful for the people she has painted and wants to show her love for her temporary home.

Although it hasn’t taken off as much as she would like, it is still central to her art projects that Raborn is working on. It won’t be a success or failure if people other than her post or don’t post using the hashtags. If anything, it’s given her a silver lining every day as she posts and looks on the bright side.

Artist Laura Raborn teaches participants in a workshop. Raborn likes to transmit the techniques used in collage, stencil, painting and drawing.
Tripp Fay/For the Summit Daily News

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Vivid oil paintings by Henri Hecht Maik and Syd Solomon sell for $20,000 each at Ahlers & Ogletree auction April 9-10 https://cuimingda.com/vivid-oil-paintings-by-henri-hecht-maik-and-syd-solomon-sell-for-20000-each-at-ahlers-ogletree-auction-april-9-10/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 16:20:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/vivid-oil-paintings-by-henri-hecht-maik-and-syd-solomon-sell-for-20000-each-at-ahlers-ogletree-auction-april-9-10/ Vivid and colorful untitled abstract oil painting by Syd Solomon (American, 1917-2004), done in celadon, peach, rust, and cobalt, signed, 28 ½ inches by 32 ½ inches (canvas) ($20,000). Oil painting on canvas by Henri Hecht Maik (French, 1922-1993), titled Le Réveil du Hibou, signed and dated lower right and titled verso ($20,000). Classical early […]]]>

Vivid and colorful untitled abstract oil painting by Syd Solomon (American, 1917-2004), done in celadon, peach, rust, and cobalt, signed, 28 ½ inches by 32 ½ inches (canvas) ($20,000).

Oil painting on canvas by Henri Hecht Maik (French, 1922-1993), titled Le Réveil du Hibou, signed and dated ($20,000).

Oil painting on canvas by Henri Hecht Maik (French, 1922-1993), titled Le Réveil du Hibou, signed and dated lower right and titled verso ($20,000).

Classical early 20th century Continental School semi-nude female marble sculpture, approximately 45 ¼ inches tall, circa 1902-1909 ($20,000).

Classical early 20th century Continental School semi-nude female marble sculpture, approximately 45 ¼ inches tall, with a partially obscured signature (“G. La….”), circa 1902-1909 (20,000 $).

Late 18th/early 19th century Guillaume et Marie parcel in gold and black lacquer Japanese style cabinet on foot ($10,625).

Late 18th/early 19th century Guillaume et Marie gilt parcel and black lacquer Japanese style cabinet on foot, the cabinet decorated with a river landscape, foliage and birds ($10,625).

Monumental pair of seated Buddhist lion figures in Chinese Sancai glaze ceramic on stands, 57 inches tall ($5,938).

Monumental pair of seated Buddhist lion figures in Chinese Sancai glaze ceramic on pedestals, 57 inches high, the male standing on a brocade ball and the female with her cub ($5,938).

The auction included antique rugs, estate jewelry and watches, mid-20th century design, fine art, sterling silver, silverware and period antiques.

ATLANTA, GA, USA, April 22, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Vivid and colorful oil paintings on canvas by Syd Solomon (American, 1917-2004) and Henri Hecht Maik (French, 1922-1993) each fetched $20,000, while a classic early 20th-century Continental School semi-nude female marble sculpture fetched $21,250 in the two-day, two-session auction Spring Estates & Collections by Ahlers & Ogletree which was held on 9th and 10th April.

The semi-nude female marble sculpture was the highest auction lot in a sale that fetched just over $1.2 million (all prices listed include a 25% buyer’s premium) . The white marble statue depicted a standing semi-nude draped woman, measuring approximately 45 ¼ inches. It had a partially obscured signature (“G. La….”) and was probably created between 1902-1909.

Syd Solomon’s untitled abstract painting, done in celadon, peach, rust and cobalt, was signed lower center and measured 28 ½ inches by 32 ½ inches (canvas, minus frame). Maik’s painting, titled Le Réveil du Hibou, was signed and dated lower right by the artist and titled on the reverse. It was snugly housed in a frame that measured 20 ¾ inches by 17 ¼ inches.

The auction, over 1,000 lots in total, included antique rugs, estate jewelry and watches, mid-20th century creations, artwork by listed artists, sterling silver and silver from Boston, period antiques from America, the United Kingdom and Europe, and several works by Marcel Mouly, Nicola Simbari and Theodor Seuss Geisel (the artist better known as Dr. Seuss).

There were no in-person auctions, but 2,600 people bid online through LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Bidsquare.com. Telephone and correspondence offers were also taken. Here are more highlights from the auction. Prices include 25% buyer’s commission.

Session 1, Saturday April 9, featured Asian Arts, Modern and Mid-Century Art and Design, Silver and Estate Jewelry – 507 lots in total. Solomon and Maik’s paintings sold out on Day 1.

Other featured Day 1 lots included a monumental pair of male and female Sancai glaze ceramic seated Chinese Buddhist lions on stands, 57 inches tall, the male standing on a brocade ball and the female with her cub (5,938 ); and a pair of Chinese white ceramic seated Buddhist guardian lions, male and female, 14 ¼ inches high, in good condition ($3,438).

Two Day 2 items hit five figures. One was a late 18th/early 19th century William and Mary parcel gilt and black lacquer Japanese cabinet on a stand, the rectangular cabinet decorated with a river landscape, foliage and birds, having two doors mounted with drilled hinges and a keyhole plate, the doors opening to reveal 10 drawers of varying sizes ($10,625).

The other was an early 20th century bronze sculpture after Pierre-Jules Mene (French, 1810-1879), titled Before the Hunt, on a later wooden plinth, signed in the mold “PJ Meane 1869” , with title and artist’s plaque at base, 27 ¾ inches high (excluding base). The cast came out of the estate of Jerome Fletcher of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida ($10,000).

A few other lots flirted with the $10,000 mark, falling just shy. One was a 19th-century English (or American) pair of two-light convex girandole mirrors in Federal or Regency giltwood, each surmounted by an eagle, having an ebonized inner fillet surrounded by spheres and decorated with acanthus leaves , unmarked, one about 36 inches tall ($9,375).

Another was a Renaissance gilt blackened plinth from the third quarter of the 19th century, attributed to the brothers Herter or Pottier & Stymus, A carved wooden plinth, parcel gilt, blackened plinth having figural mounts, classical medallion, incised scroll decoration , a spreading base and rising on the paw feet, unmarked, 39 inches high ($8,750).

An oil on canvas painting by Frank Virgil Dudley (American, 1868-1957), titled Winding River at Dusk (1907), signed and dated and in a 28¾-inch by 37¾-inch frame, fetched $8,750; while an oil on board by Alfred Thompson Bricher (American 1837-1908), titled Cliff and Boats, signed lower left and in a 14 by 12 inch frame, cost $7,500.

Rounding out this short list of top winners from the two-day sale are a pair of 19th-century French Empire gilt porcelain potpourri, each in a spread-out shape with hymn-decorated corners, the reserves alternating with classic landscapes and muses, having a “Mark Nast Paris” below on the painting, 11 ½ inches tall ($3,750).

Ahlers & Ogletree is a multi-faceted family business covering the antiques, estate, wholesale, liquidation, auction and related industries. Ahlers & Ogletree is always on the lookout for quality submissions for future auctions. To consign an item, estate, or collection, you can call them at 404-869-2478; or, you can email them, at consign@AandOauctions.com.

To learn more about Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery or to join their mailing list for information on upcoming auctions, please visit www.aandoauctions.com. Updates are released often. You can also follow Ahlers & Ogletree via social media on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Facebook.

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Elizabeth Rickenbaker
Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Gallery
+1 404-869-2478
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Artist documents the pain of isolation in realistic oil paintings https://cuimingda.com/artist-documents-the-pain-of-isolation-in-realistic-oil-paintings/ Sun, 10 Apr 2022 17:55:15 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/artist-documents-the-pain-of-isolation-in-realistic-oil-paintings/ “It’s not what you wanted”, 2021 New York artist Alyssa Monks forces us to confront deep feelings of anguish in her new series titled Everything is under control. Inspired by the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, these realistic canvases compel viewers to watch the emotional tales of solitary figures, slightly abstracted by the damp […]]]>

“It’s not what you wanted”, 2021

New York artist Alyssa Monks forces us to confront deep feelings of anguish in her new series titled Everything is under control. Inspired by the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, these realistic canvases compel viewers to watch the emotional tales of solitary figures, slightly abstracted by the damp glass of their shower stalls.

From hiding behind their hands to staring at the wall, these intimate portraits depict a range of reactions to crisis, each with their own unique voice. “Sometimes the recent global and national devastation, division and so many disappointments felt like a surreal projection of my own mental states in isolation over the past 18 months,” Monks says. “I began to explore the human addiction to control and predictability, and how our deepest suffering stems from our attachment to security, virtue, identity, and the logic of cause and effect.”

According to Monks, placing the figures in a slightly transparent bathroom cubicle serves several purposes. “The glass barrier in these paintings between subject and viewer is darkened by a vapor that obscures and abstracts the subject,” she says. “This barrier underscores the personal and community concern about virus-laden respiratory droplets and the isolation it creates.” As a result, the viewer’s perception of these characters is ambiguous; we cannot see the full expression of their faces or any clear details. Instead, we infer their emotions through body language and the drama of the foggy setting.

Some of the paintings in this series are still available for purchase through the Forum Gallery. You can also find prints of the artist’s paintings via his website, and keep up to date with Monks’ latest work and upcoming exhibitions by following the artist on Instagram.

New York artist Alyssa Monks captures the human addiction to control and predictability in her series Everything is under control.

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

“Watch the only way out”, 2021

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

Detail of “It’s not what you wanted”, 2021

Inspired by the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, this series features paintings of lonely figures in times of deep distress.

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

“Everything is under control”, 2021

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

“Dissociate”, 2021

Each woman is alone in the shower cubicle, her anguish clearly felt even though her expression is distorted by the misty, wet glass.

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

“No turning back”, 2021

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

Detail of “No turning back”, 2021

Distressed Figure Oil Painting by Alyssa Monks

“We never see it coming”, 2021

Alyssa Monks: Website | Facebook | instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos of Alyssa Monks.

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The hyper-realistic oil paintings of Agnieszka Nienartowicz https://cuimingda.com/the-hyper-realistic-oil-paintings-of-agnieszka-nienartowicz/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 16:12:17 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/the-hyper-realistic-oil-paintings-of-agnieszka-nienartowicz/ Polish artist Agnieszka Nienartowicz uses oil paints to create stunningly realistic portraits of women. But these aren’t just any women, these are women with elaborate tattoos. Draped across their backs are incredibly detailed compositions inspired by classical art. From Hieronymus Bosch to Guido Reni, the Old Masters are seeing their masterpieces interpreted in new and […]]]>

Polish artist Agnieszka Nienartowicz uses oil paints to create stunningly realistic portraits of women. But these aren’t just any women, these are women with elaborate tattoos. Draped across their backs are incredibly detailed compositions inspired by classical art. From Hieronymus Bosch to Guido Reni, the Old Masters are seeing their masterpieces interpreted in new and contemporary ways.

We discovered Nienartowicz’s work several years ago, when she used the Garden of Earthly Delights as inspiration for an elegant oil painting. At the time, she had recently graduated from art school and was promising immense promise. Over time, she has more than delivered on that promise, and year after year her paintings continue to inspire admiration and make a strong impression. Each piece is imbued with a strong sense of spirituality that reflects Nienartowicz’s own sensibilities.

By permanently adorning these women with such historical and religious imagery, an emotional charge is brought to the paintings. In this way, Nienartowicz is able to use the weight of historical art while bringing it into the 21st century. And by delving into the detail of each canvas, there is a new appreciation for the artist’s ability to paint skillfully in a classical manner. With barely perceptible brushstrokes, she faithfully renders the classic composition, and this, on a miniature scale.

This miniaturism contrasts with his ability to create the human form and clothing in a remarkably realistic manner. Thus, each canvas is a masterclass in oil painting. By combining technical skill and emotional impact, she pushes the boundaries of what can be expected of contemporary art. Although many often associate the contemporary with the abstract, Nienartowicz’s work proves that figurative oil painting can be just as avant-garde.

Agnieszka Nienartowicz is known for her detailed oil paintings of tattooed women.

Contemporary art based on Hieronymus Bosch

“Purple Ribbon” after Hieronymus Bosch

Spectacular tattoos are based on classic pieces of art.

Contemporary art based on Hieronymus Bosch

“Purple Ribbon” (detail) after Hieronymus Bosch

Contemporary art based on Hieronymus Bosch

“Purple Ribbon” (detail) after Hieronymus Bosch

The Polish artist paints in a hyper-realistic way imbued with emotion.

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The Unveiling”

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The Last Judgment” by Anton Möller

And often selects biblical scenes for his tattoos.

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“Tears of Mary Magdalene” by Guido Reni

Contemporary oil painting by Agnieszka Nienartowicz

“The Sheep of God” by Hans Memling

Careful attention to detail shows his high level of technical skill with oil painting.

Contemporary oil painting by Agnieszka Nienartowicz

“The Sheep of God” (detail) after Hans Memling

Hyperrealistic Oil Painting Tattoo

“The Fall of the Rebel Angels” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The Fall of the Rebel Angels” (detail) from Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The Last Judgment” (detail) from Anton Möller

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The tears of Mary Magdalene” (detail) after Guido Reni

Agnieszka Nienartowicz Oil Painting

“The Unveiling” (detail)

Agnieszka Nienartowicz: Website | Facebook | instagram

All images via Agnieszka Nienartowicz.

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Jack Vettriano will present first unseen oil paintings in a new exhibition of works https://cuimingda.com/jack-vettriano-will-present-first-unseen-oil-paintings-in-a-new-exhibition-of-works/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/jack-vettriano-will-present-first-unseen-oil-paintings-in-a-new-exhibition-of-works/ Previously unseen paintings by Jack Vettriano will feature in an exhibition at the gallery where he sought inspiration as a young artist. The exhibition at the Kirkcaldy Galleries in Fife will include 12 oil paintings he produced in his early twenties and thirties, signed with his birth name, Jack Hoggan. The works, painted before he […]]]>

Previously unseen paintings by Jack Vettriano will feature in an exhibition at the gallery where he sought inspiration as a young artist.

The exhibition at the Kirkcaldy Galleries in Fife will include 12 oil paintings he produced in his early twenties and thirties, signed with his birth name, Jack Hoggan.

The works, painted before he achieved international success in the 1990s, will be displayed alongside pieces that sold for five- and six-figure sums.

It will be the 70-year-old artist’s first retrospective since a major exhibition at Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in 2013 and the first to focus on his formative years and early career.

Although widely panned by critics, Jack Vettriano has sold his paintings for hundreds of thousands of pounds and has an estimated net worth of £3.6million. Pictured: Sweet Bird of Youth by Vettriano, who has already been seen

Vettriano, left school at 15 to become a mining engineer but took up painting after a girlfriend gave him a box of watercolors for his 21st birthday.  Pictured: The Billy Boys by Vettriano, whose prints sell for hundreds of pounds

Vettriano, left school at 15 to become a mining engineer but took up painting after a girlfriend gave him a box of watercolors for his 21st birthday. Pictured: The Billy Boys by Vettriano, whose prints sell for hundreds of pounds

Self Portrait, a 2002 painting by Jack Vettriano which will feature in an exhibition which will include previously unseen works, unlike this one, at the Kirkcaldy Galleries in Fife, where he sought inspiration as a young artist

Self Portrait, a 2002 painting by Jack Vettriano which will feature in an exhibition which will include previously unseen works, unlike this one, at the Kirkcaldy Galleries in Fife, where he sought inspiration as a young artist

Vettriano, from Fife, left school at 15 to become a mining engineer but took up painting after a girlfriend gave him a box of watercolors for his 21st birthday.

The artist learned by copying Old Masters, Impressionists and Scottish artists and was inspired by works he saw in the Kirkcaldy Galleries, run by cultural charity OnFife.

He said: “I grew up admiring the work of so many great Scottish painters in what was then my local gallery.

Jack Vettriano (pictured) was once called

Jack Vettriano (pictured) was once called ‘not a 21st-century Van Gogh’, but rather ‘the Tom Jones of art: tall, bold, brassy and devoid of inner truth’.

Vettriano's most famous painting, The Singing Butler, featuring a couple dancing on a beach despite an approaching storm, sold for nearly £750,000 at auction in 2004

Vettriano’s most famous painting, The Singing Butler, featuring a couple dancing on a beach despite an approaching storm, sold for almost £750,000 at auction in 2004

“Kirkcaldy has a large permanent collection and a free entry policy, so I have the galleries to thank for the start of my art education.”

The artist later adopted his mother’s maiden name to mark a break with the works sold under his surname Hoggan.

The new exhibition opens in June and will include one of two paintings Vettriano presented at the Royal Scottish Academy’s annual exhibition in 1988.

Sculptor David Mach spoke in favor of Vettriano saying in The Scotsman:

Sculptor David Mach spoke in support of Vettriano, saying in The Scotsman: “If he was a fashion designer, Jack would be up there.” Pictured: Vettriano’s painting Mad Dogs. Images of the 12 previously unseen paintings featured in his exhibition have yet to be released.

Mr Mach added: 'It's just snobbery in the art world.  Anyway, whatever, he probably makes more money than Damien Hirst anyway.  Pictured: Vettriano at his home in Battersea, London

Mr Mach added: ‘It’s just snobbery in the art world. Anyway, whatever, he probably makes more money than Damien Hirst anyway. Pictured: Vettriano at his home in Battersea, London

Both paintings sold on the first day, a turning point that inspired him to become a full-time artist.

Among the 57 private loans will be pieces such as Billy Boys, Valentine Rose and Bluebird in Bonneville, while two works from OnFife’s collection, including a self-portrait, will also feature.

Alice Pearson, OnFife Exhibitions Curator, said: “This is the first time that Jack has agreed to exhibit painted works simply as a hobby alongside later pieces which have won sold-out shows in London and New York.

The painter Jack Vettriano, whose work has been called

Painter Jack Vettriano, whose work has been branded ‘dim erotica’ but sells for hundreds of thousands of pounds, has slammed the art establishment for snubbing his work

“The exhibit will highlight the diversity of subjects and styles Jack tackled while learning his craft, giving him the confidence and technical ability to develop his own identifiable style.”

Also included will be Long Time Gone, which takes place against the backdrop of the now demolished Methil Power Station, a once familiar landmark of Fife.

The exhibition, which covers the artist’s career up to 2000, was originally scheduled for 2019 but has been postponed twice due to Covid-19 restrictions.

Who is Jack Vettriano and why do critics hate his work?

Despite his immense popularity with the public, Jack Vettriano was often the recipient of more negative comments from art critics and was once described as “the Jeffrey Archer of the art world”.

Over the years, his work has been described as twee and chauvinistic, with his more erotic material considered “pornography”.

However, his work has sold for thousands, and he is believed to be Britain’s most reproduced artist – making thousands of versions of his paintings. His net worth is estimated at £3.6million.

Scottish art historian Duncan Macmillan once said of Vittriano: “He is welcome to paint as long as no one takes him seriously”.

The Guardian art critic Jonathan Jones said: “Jack Vettriano is not a 21st century Van Gogh. he is the Tom Jones of art: tall, bold, brassy and devoid of inner truth.

Jones added: “Jack Vettriano’s world is a crude male fantasy that could have come straight out of Martin Amis’ Money.”

Sandy Moffat, head of drawing and painting at the Glasgow School of Art, said: ‘He can’t paint, he just colours’, while Richard Calvocoressi, former director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, said: “I would be more than happy to say that we regard him as an indifferent painter and very low on our list of priorities (whether or not we can afford his work, which we obviously cannot not for the moment).

“His ‘popularity’ is based on cheap commercial reproductions of his paintings.”

Vittriano claimed that Van Gogh and Monet would have been in favor of selling reproductions.

Alice Jones wrote in The Independent that in Vettriano’s paintings, “women are sex objects, often half-naked and vulnerable, always in stockings and stilettos”.

Yet sculptor David Mach spoke out in favor of Vettriano, saying in The Scotsman: “If he was a fashion designer, Jack would be up there.

“It’s just snobbery in the art world. Anyway, whatever, he probably makes more money than Damien Hirst anyway.

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WNC hosts Rowlett’s oil paintings https://cuimingda.com/wnc-hosts-rowletts-oil-paintings/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/wnc-hosts-rowletts-oil-paintings/ Kim Rowlett’s paintings are on display at Western Nevada College’s Fallon Campus Gallery through Jan. 22. By Marie Nygren Wednesday, December 22, 2021 Kim Rowlett, a retired English teacher from Churchill County High School, wanted to write a book, until a decision was made to enroll in Gil Martin’s art course at Western Nevada College.During […]]]>

Kim Rowlett’s paintings are on display at Western Nevada College’s Fallon Campus Gallery through Jan. 22.


Kim Rowlett, a retired English teacher from Churchill County High School, wanted to write a book, until a decision was made to enroll in Gil Martin’s art course at Western Nevada College.
During her lessons, she fell in love with oil painting. Eleven years later, Rowlett continues his artistic journey. WNC’s Fallon Campus Gallery will exhibit Rowlett’s paintings until January 20.
Rowlett likes to paint in an impressionistic style with a flow of light that represents freedom and creates magic. His tools are a brush for detail and background, and a palette knife for abstract effects, texture and to add a whimsical feel, which is his personal trademark.
His palette is lively, demonstrating a true mastery of color.
“I love showing my work. My paintings are upbeat and colorful, and they bring happiness,” Rowlett said.
An intriguing piece of his work is called “The Covid Painting”. Recently painted during isolation, this artwork is an expression of hope to show that there is light at the end of the COVID tunnel. It alludes to the temporal state of this condition.
Inspiration for Rowlett’s paintings comes from everywhere: her personal expression of how she sees the world, nature, other oil painters, objects and people around her. This wide diversity of subjects, such as hummingbirds, aspens, cats, ballerinas and her favorite pastimes like reading, all come together in her art.
Rowlett’s future plans include being part of an upcoming NAA exhibit in Carson City at Brewery Arts. Her paintings begin to show a mystical aura and she wants to continue in this trend. Some of these paintings are created within a group called “Heart Artists”. The painters who meet at 4082 Reno Highway every Wednesday at 9 a.m. work on their personal art, helping each other as needed. All artists are invited to join them.
The public is invited to view Rowlett’s exhibition at the WNC during gallery hours, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., excluding holidays.

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The Artist Travels to Fantastic Places in Exquisite Oil Paintings https://cuimingda.com/the-artist-travels-to-fantastic-places-in-exquisite-oil-paintings/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/the-artist-travels-to-fantastic-places-in-exquisite-oil-paintings/ This article may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more information. Sometimes the experience of looking at a painting can transport you to a different time and place. And while most canvases are grounded in reality, artist Aaron Long prefers […]]]>

This article may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more information.

Sometimes the experience of looking at a painting can transport you to a different time and place. And while most canvases are grounded in reality, artist Aaron Long prefers to create compositions that ignite the imagination. His series of carefully rendered oil paintings depict distant locations inspired by the fantasy genre.

From haunting blue cities illuminated by the night sky to pristine forest environments, the artist traverses an array of different destinations, each of which appears fully formed in her paintings. Long uses traditional techniques to portray fantastical places as realistically as sites that exist in real life. Whether it’s foreign architecture or a new mountain range, he faithfully adapts these original concepts as he sees them in his mind.

Based in Missouri, Long has been painting since 2013. “I discovered my love of painting through online tutorials like Bob Ross and Kevin Hill,” he told My Modern Met. “I also discovered my love for fan art when I tried to recreate [scenes and places] from the Lord of the Rings and Skyrim in my landscape paintings. Most of his work is based on fictional locations from video games, books, and TV shows.

You can purchase original artwork and prints through Long’s Etsy shop and keep up to date with his latest projects by following the artist on Instagram.

Missouri-based artist Aaron Long creates stunning oil paintings of fantasy landscapes and cities.

Aaron Long's Fantastic Oil PaintingsAaron Long's Fantastic Oil PaintingsFantasy Oil Paintings

Aaron Long's Fantastic Oil PaintingsAaron Long's Fantastic Oil PaintingsAaron Long: Etsy | Facebook | instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos of Aaron Long.

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Expressive oil paintings capture the many textures of nature https://cuimingda.com/expressive-oil-paintings-capture-the-many-textures-of-nature/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/expressive-oil-paintings-capture-the-many-textures-of-nature/ From grassy fields to turbulent clouds, landscapes are made up of many textures. British-Canadian artist Georgia Hart illustrates the layered beauty of the horizon in her striking impasto oil paintings. She exclusively uses palette knives to render the many shapes on paper. “The thick peaks of paint incorporate another layer into my work, contrasting with […]]]>

From grassy fields to turbulent clouds, landscapes are made up of many textures. British-Canadian artist Georgia Hart illustrates the layered beauty of the horizon in her striking impasto oil paintings. She exclusively uses palette knives to render the many shapes on paper.

“The thick peaks of paint incorporate another layer into my work, contrasting with the delicate, immaculate oil paper that deliberately frames bold and often rugged scenes,” she tells My Modern Met. “These 3D qualities allow the work to be more than a landscape painting: aiming to evoke intense emotion while serving as a window into a place that is both familiar and distant.”

Hart’s ties to Canada and England are evident in her subject matter, as she often depicts the rugged mountain peaks of Canada as well as the pristine beaches of Cornwall in southwest England. Each piece seems to capture a distinct moment in time, in which clouds rush across the sky and light hits the landscape below in a specific way. “I use painting as a way to explore changes in landscapes: considering how perspective, time and the seasons can create an uncontrollable and fleeting mood. Palette knives add an expressive touch to my representational work .

You can purchase original artwork through Hart’s website and keep up to date with his latest creations by following the artist on Instagram.

British-Canadian artist Georgia Hart creates striking textured landscape paintings using a palette knife.

Textured Landscape Paintings by Georgia HartTextured Landscape Paintings by Georgia HartTextured Landscape Paintings by Georgia HartTextured Landscape Paintings by Georgia HartTextured Landscape Paintings by Georgia HartTextured Landscape Paintings by Georgia Hart

Expressive works are often painted on oil paper.

Georgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart Oil PaintingsGeorgia Hart: Website | instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos of Georgia Hart.

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