Fantasy paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ Sat, 07 May 2022 16:18:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cuimingda.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-25T191724.119-150x150.png Fantasy paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ 32 32 Ludovic Nkoth’s vivid paintings capture all the intensities of life https://cuimingda.com/ludovic-nkoths-vivid-paintings-capture-all-the-intensities-of-life/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/ludovic-nkoths-vivid-paintings-capture-all-the-intensities-of-life/ His scenes are drawn not only from memories of lived experiences, but also from imagined experiences. “There are many aspects of my daily life that come together in my paintings: my environment, the architecture of my present and my past, all the environments that I occupy,” the artist said. “My mood goes into every painting […]]]>

His scenes are drawn not only from memories of lived experiences, but also from imagined experiences. “There are many aspects of my daily life that come together in my paintings: my environment, the architecture of my present and my past, all the environments that I occupy,” the artist said. “My mood goes into every painting I create even when I don’t want it to. Over the years, my relationship with painting has become an extension of my own existence.

Nkoth continues to stress the importance of being aware of the current state of the world and its social structures. In his latest body of work, he references musicians and activists, such as Fela Kuti, whose works have masterfully embodied empowering and empathetic storytelling with the plight of the oppressed. Named after some of Kuti’s songs, Teacher, don’t teach me nonsense (2022) depicts a child lovingly held by its seated mother while the father reclines comfortably beside them, and VIP Part 1 (2022) and VIP Part 2 (2022) both depict black men relaxing next to their motorcycles in midnight blue surroundings. The inclusion of these references raises thought-provoking questions about power, challenge and self-determination, situating Nkoth’s works within a larger historical picture and discourse.

]]>
Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo’s paintings capture the freedom and openness of childhood https://cuimingda.com/alemayehu-regasa-wariyos-paintings-capture-the-freedom-and-openness-of-childhood/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/alemayehu-regasa-wariyos-paintings-capture-the-freedom-and-openness-of-childhood/ Depicted in vibrant, almost Fauvist colors, Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo’s paintings communicate their expression of childlike wonder not only through their choice of palette, but also through their almost doodle art style. It’s as if the best pieces of marginalia have been refined and made worthy of display. As a painting scholar who studied Fine Arts […]]]>

Depicted in vibrant, almost Fauvist colors, Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo’s paintings communicate their expression of childlike wonder not only through their choice of palette, but also through their almost doodle art style. It’s as if the best pieces of marginalia have been refined and made worthy of display.

As a painting scholar who studied Fine Arts and Design at Addis Ababa University, Alemayehu says they have always been drawn to the freedom and openness of children. Using these qualities as a starting point, they then harness them to create paintings that seem to come almost entirely from instinct.



© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo

© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo



© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo

“For me, art is not a skill but just an expression of feeling,” Alemayehu told Creative Boom. “I chose to paint about childhood because it is full of so many beautiful memories.”

Tempering this expressive perspective, however, is a solid understanding of art history. Alemayehu is primarily inspired by the Swiss-German Expressionist, Cubist and Surrealist Paul Klee, as well as the paintings of French-Russian artist Marc Chagall, known for his distinctly colorful and abstract style.

“I like the simplicity and the childish works of Paul Klee”, explains Alemayehu. “And I’m drawn to the fantastical elements of Marc Chagall’s work. I want people to feel free and happy when they look at my work. And when I paint, I feel like I’m in conversation with nature. .”

Unlike most artists working today, Alemayehu does not have a website or online presence, making it one of the only works you are likely to find by the artist. Perhaps this is part of their effect, as the pleasure they provide is fleeting yet impactful, like childhood memories themselves.

© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo



© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo

© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo



© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo

© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo



© Alemayehu Regasa Wariyo

]]>
Why is there such a hunger for Ivy Haldeman’s paintings of human hot dogs and hollow suits? https://cuimingda.com/why-is-there-such-a-hunger-for-ivy-haldemans-paintings-of-human-hot-dogs-and-hollow-suits/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 00:31:10 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/why-is-there-such-a-hunger-for-ivy-haldemans-paintings-of-human-hot-dogs-and-hollow-suits/ The objects in Ivy Haldeman’s larger-than-life paintings also have aspirations. Disembodied figures in pointed-shoulder blazers with matching pencil skirts appear to have strolled out of earshot after a board meeting to discuss how they really feel. Anthropomorphic hot dogs with delicate features loung suggestively, read, apply moisturizer and talk on banana phones inside their golden […]]]>

The objects in Ivy Haldeman’s larger-than-life paintings also have aspirations.

Disembodied figures in pointed-shoulder blazers with matching pencil skirts appear to have strolled out of earshot after a board meeting to discuss how they really feel. Anthropomorphic hot dogs with delicate features loung suggestively, read, apply moisturizer and talk on banana phones inside their golden buns.

“I find them very close,” Haldeman said on a call from his Brooklyn Navy Yard studio in New York. The artist, 36, has been painting quirky, everyday moments of animate and inanimate things for half a decade, though his work seems increasingly relevant after a few years indoors.

The human gestures of his slightly bored hot dogs and empty power suits simultaneously convey lethargy, desire and luxury, while addressing issues of gender and identity in a way that now places Haldeman among artists. the most demanded of his generation.

Two Figures, Eyes Closed, Arm Outstretched, Leg Dangles, Forearms Cross, Toe Touches Edge, 2021. Collection of the Yuz Foundation. Photo: Pierre Le Hors; courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.” width=”1024″ height=”493″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/03 /1.-Ivy-Haldeman-Yuz-Museum-1024×493.jpg 1024w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/03/1.-Ivy-Haldeman-Yuz-Museum-300×144. jpg 300w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/03/1.-Ivy-Haldeman-Yuz-Museum-50×24.jpg 50w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw , 1024px”/>

Ivy Haldeman, Two silhouettes, eyes closed, arm outstretched, leg hanging down, forearms crossed, toe touching edge, 2021. Collection of the Yuz Foundation. Photo: Pierre Le Hors; courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.

“Ivy focuses a sort of spellbinding attention to visual codes of aspiration and self-reliance,” said gallerist Alex Ross. He is the director of Downs & Ross, which represents Haldeman in New York. “It’s hard to think of a practice that more subtly marbles the relationship between desire and consumerism in a way that’s both seductive and elegantly complex.”

He added: “All of his recent solo exhibitions, worldwide and without exception, have sold out.”

Prices have risen with demand. Last year, for example, Haldeman’s acrylic on canvas Two suits, folded cuff, pocket cuff (purple, peach), which is part of his Capsule Shanghai 2019 exhibition “(Hesitate)”, had been estimated at $20,000 to $30,000 at auction. Instead, it grossed over $138,000.

Ivy Haldeman, <i>Two Suits, Wrist Bent, Cuff to Pocket (Mauve, Peach)</i>2019. Image courtesy of the artist and Capsule, Shanghai.” width=”944″ height=”1024″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022 /03/6-Ivy-Peach-Mauve-Capsule-944×1024.jpg 944w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/03/6-Ivy-Peach-Mauve-Capsule-277×300. jpg 277w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/03/6-Ivy-Peach-Mauve-Capsule-46×50.jpg 46w” sizes=”(max-width: 944px) 100vw, 944px”/></p>
<p class=Ivy Haldeman, Two suits, folded cuff, pocket cuff (purple, peach)2019. Image courtesy of the artist and Capsule, Shanghai.

Today, Haldeman’s works are held in public and private collections around the world, from the Dallas Museum of Art to the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami, to the X Museum in Beijing and the Yuz Museum in Shanghai. .

While planning Haldeman’s first solo exhibition at Downs & Ross in September 2018, Ross said, “It was apparent that she was advancing a new language for portraiture that would prove hugely important.

Haldeman’s paintings speak an idiosyncratic yet universal language. Inspired by the way color reads in Ukiyo-e woodblock prints by Japanese artists such as Kitagawa Utamaro, she uses pigments to create a backlit effect, as if you are viewing her works through a screen.

When she paints, she lets thin layers of acrylic dry for 24 hours straight, to help her canvases reflect light. “I think a lot about the materials in my work,” she said. “Acrylic is a type of plastic, and it’s really funny because my grandfather was a plastic salesman,” Haldeman said. “The plastics company financed my mother’s artistic studies. now i am here [creating] plastic paints.

A view of the 2021 exhibition "Ivy Haldeman: Twice" at Downs & Ross, New York.  Pictured: Phoebe D'Heurle;  courtesy of the artist and the gallery.

A view of the 2021 exhibition “Ivy Haldeman: Twice” at Downs & Ross, New York. Pictured: Phoebe D’Heurle; courtesy of the artist and the gallery.

The artist has long reflected on the visual culture of capitalism. “When I was five, I was thinking about costumes,” she said. “I was like, How do we become adults? How to usurp power in the world? This imagery enters the psyche very early.

By then, she had already received her first sketchbook, a gift from her textile artist mother, who took Colorado-born Haldeman to museums wherever her military family moved – Boston, Maryland, Germany and beyond. of the. “I remember falling asleep at her big printing tables where she was painting silk scarves,” she said. “She really encouraged me to engage in art.”

Haldeman then studied at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York. “I didn’t really know if I wanted to do art, but I felt like I needed to expand my world,” she said. After graduating, still uncertain, she took legal and medical writing jobs and trained as an EMT.

Then she said, “I had this funny moment where I was like, Do you know what I like to do? I like to dream of all the things that I could be.” So she chose the life of an artist.

While Haldeman began sketching her hot dogs after a trip to Buenos Aires in 2011, inspired by a hand-painted snack advertisement she spotted on the side of a convenience store in town, her experience of living or surviving New York as a young artist gave new meaning to the initial drawings.

“A very important part of me coming to paint this hot dog figure was realizing that the hot dog was not a figure to be laughed at,” she said.

Ivy Haldeman, Full Figure, Head Leans on Bun Edge, Leg Akimbo, Bottom Enfolded, 2021. Photo: Phoebe D'Heurle;  courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.

Ivy Haldeman, Full figure, head rests on edge of bun, leg akimbo, bottom tucked in, 2021. Photo: Phoebe D’Heurle; courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.

“I know what it’s like to try to be a person, but you find you’re just caught up in the grind of work and commercialism. I know what it’s like to feel very masculine, but I don’t know what to do with my femininity. I know what it’s like to be a brutal human, but I yearn for some sort of upper-class elegance. His hot dog buns are sometimes shaped like fur coats.

Long fascinated by Hellenistic works, Haldeman has always imagined her hot dogs as colossal figures. Over time, his studio space and his works grew to accommodate this dream. she now employs two assistants in her Brooklyn Navy Yard studio, whose 14-foot ceilings and 10-foot doorways allow her increasingly large canvases to be transported.

This summer, Shanghai’s Yuz Foundation will host a solo exhibition by Haldeman featuring his largest paintings to date, measuring up to 20 feet in length.

Lily Wang, associate director of the foundation, compared Haldeman’s work to that of sculptor Claes Oldenburg Two cheeseburgers, with everything (two burgers) and also to the theoretician of French literature Roland Barthes Mythologies. “People can easily see themselves in his paintings,” she said.

Ivy Haldeman, Twice Colossus, Head Leans Left, Pinky Up, Head Leans Right (Gaze), 2021. Collection of Smart Museum, University of Chicago.  Pictured: Phoebe D'Heurle;  courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.

Ivy Haldeman, Twice colossus, head tilted left, little finger up, head tilted right (look), 2021. Collection of the Smart Museum, University of Chicago. Pictured: Phoebe D’Heurle; courtesy of the artist and Downs & Ross, New York.

Haldeman’s more recent works grapple with the constant encounters one has with one’s self-image these days, when the intention may be “to project oneself into other social spaces, but you are actually looking at yourself while you do it,” she said. It’s a relevant pursuit for anyone navigating a progressively digital and isolated world that simultaneously invites constant visibility.

Last year an anonymous donor purchased Haldeman’s Twice colossus, head tilted left, little finger up, head tilted right (look) for the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art. It features two hot dogs looking at each other or, perhaps, a hot dog looking at its own reflection.

Either way, as Jennifer Carty, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, said, “During our incredibly unpredictable and tumultuous times, it seems only right to turn to the surreal.”

The real world is exhausting indeed, filled with power trips and all-too-real interactions, both online and IRL, that feel less human than hot dogs and hollow suits. Haldeman’s work offers a sense of respite from everything, residing in an “imaginary space where nothing happens”, as she put it.

“It takes on new meaning when everyone’s home, maybe lounging on a sofa that looks remarkably like this bun.”

Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay one step ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to receive breaking news, revealing interviews and incisive reviews that move the conversation forward.

]]>
Egyptian artist wears replicas of Beirut explosion on her paintings | Mimoza Al-Arawi https://cuimingda.com/egyptian-artist-wears-replicas-of-beirut-explosion-on-her-paintings-mimoza-al-arawi/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 15:30:42 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/egyptian-artist-wears-replicas-of-beirut-explosion-on-her-paintings-mimoza-al-arawi/ She said the experience “involved trauma and psychological changes that many people went through, culminating in the explosion at the port of Beirut. The circumstances still affect me, even though a year and a half has passed. since. “ Shayma Kamel’s work can be considered a clear example of contemporary art that offers great contrast […]]]>

She said the experience “involved trauma and psychological changes that many people went through, culminating in the explosion at the port of Beirut. The circumstances still affect me, even though a year and a half has passed. since. “

Shayma Kamel’s work can be considered a clear example of contemporary art that offers great contrast between the way the artist perceives his paintings and the completely different light under which viewers view them.

The idea of ​​the exhibition revolves around the artist and her logic of visual storytelling, as shown in previous exhibitions, notably “Les Contes de Cendrillon”.

She tells how “a little girl traveled in her sleep to many countries, and when she woke up she continued to tell on the walls of the houses her dream and the legends she met, how she dreamed that she had wings and could fly and wouldn’t have to come back.

“For five years the child spoke to the silent walls around him telling them of his travels, his sleep, his anger, his recurring desires and dreams, until the day I woke up with the second biggest explosion in the world… I rode the first kite and crossed the sea.

Most of the artist’s paintings feature tattoos or symbols from ancient legacies laden with ambiguities.

There is a strong element of fantasy in his works alongside realistic scenes. More recent works, like those of his previous exhibition, are immersed in the imagination to the point of delirium.

A greater balance between fantasy and reality was best seen in his previous two exhibitions.

The overflowing imagination that transpires from his latest works means that his painted scenes often seem to project a terrifying atmosphere that the artist may have in common with all the peoples of the region. In fact, it is from this that the authenticity of his artistic works seems to derive.

The artist uses earthy colors in his paintings with red topping all the hues, creating the impression of a desert atmosphere enveloping his paintings.

In all of her works, Shayma Kamel addresses the idea of ​​the struggle between good and evil. In this exhibition, this logic is alive. It is evil that triumphs over good, even temporarily.

Many of the scenes drawn in his paintings tend to inspire fear, as hybrid forms of a larger than life insect world are on display and appear to have stories to tell.

The exhibition presents a visual artist’s interpretation of the traumatized world of Beirut and other traumatized environments elsewhere in the Arab region.

]]>
Carroll Dunham’s paintings make you squirm https://cuimingda.com/carroll-dunhams-paintings-make-you-squirm/ Sun, 03 Apr 2022 10:00:45 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/carroll-dunhams-paintings-make-you-squirm/ There is something enigmatic in the work of Carroll Dunham, even if the pictorial vocabulary he employs seems simple. Using bold planes of color and almost cartoonish outlines, Dunham often depicts naked human figures in imaginary natural landscapes, populated by naively rendered trees and birds, dogs and flowers. In his paintings and drawings of women […]]]>

There is something enigmatic in the work of Carroll Dunham, even if the pictorial vocabulary he employs seems simple. Using bold planes of color and almost cartoonish outlines, Dunham often depicts naked human figures in imaginary natural landscapes, populated by naively rendered trees and birds, dogs and flowers. In his paintings and drawings of women with heavy breasts and thick thighs bathing, or hirsute men fighting, Dunham allows the viewer to encounter life in lively, spirited action. And yet there is a palpable opacity about his subjects: who are these half-biblical, half-sci-fi figures, with their pimple-like nipples and tufts of dark pubic hair, their bodies splaying out jarringly on an indifferently cheerful landscape? What is the purpose and meaning of the obscure rituals that Dunham depicts these figures engaging in, eyes averted from the viewer, as if reluctant to have their private customs disturbed or even watched?

The outer space strangeness of Dunham’s protagonists might remind us that the artist’s path to the figurative nude was unconventional. Born in Connecticut, where he attended Trinity College, Dunham moved to New York in the early 1970s and began working as an assistant to painter Dorothea Rockburne. His own work was influenced by the cool-to-the-touch, pared-down, post-minimalist approach of Rockburne and his milieu, where art was “viewed as a philosophical exercise,” Dunham told me. “I had a very, very reductive vocabulary in my work.” From the late 1970s through the 1980s, Dunham’s paintings and drawings approached abstraction, depicting systemic swirls of line and color. And yet, over the years and as his career evolved, Dunham found himself increasingly drawn to the representation of the human figure, first within the framework of a semi-abstract pictorial language, then ‘where certain repetitive symbols nevertheless emerged – top hats, guns, mouths, penises, vulvas, then, increasingly, in the fully fleshed out images of men and women, a rich vein that he has now been pursuing ever since almost two decades. “My whole thing as an artist is to withdraw into things,” he told me. Later he added, “At some point, life starts to seep in.”

Today, at seventy-two, Dunham is one of the most successful and respected American painters of his generation. His work has been collected by many art institutions here and abroad, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art and Museum Ludwig. More recently his paintings were featured in a solo exhibition at the Eva Presenhuber Gallery, Zurich, where Dunham depicted his familiar women and men not separately but together, for the first time, in acts of copulation. (Also for the first time, these subjects were painted green.) Since the early 1990s and 1980s, Dunham has been married to artist Laurie Simmons, with whom he has two children: director, screenwriter and actress Lena Dunham , and writer and activist Cyrus Dunham. The couple split their time between a house in Connecticut, where Dunham also maintains his paint studio, and an apartment near Union Square. I have been a fan of Dunham’s work for about ten years – one of his little ballpoint pen drawings, in which a nude woman is shown from behind, is one of my most treasured possessions – and, there is a few years ago I met him and became more intimately acquainted with his paintings when I wrote a catalog essay on one of his series. Recently, I delved even deeper when I sat down with the artist in her New York home for a conversation about painting, the body, repression, and family.

You have just returned from Zurich, where you presented a personal exhibition at the Eva Presenhuber gallery, which has been your gallery for ten years. I looked at the images online and saw that while the art is very much tied to your past work, for the first time your characters are . . . green?

It’s a big change. It’s quite a change.

Also for the first time, these characters, men and women, are making love.

It’s been in my head for years, but this is the first time I’ve understood how to make paintings work that have men and women together in the same paintings. They seem to be mating, so they have something to do with each other. It took me years to figure out a way to work with a subject like this without it being gratuitous sensationalism. That’s how it goes with painting, for me. It just takes a long time for things to happen.

But even with your figurative images where there is no copulation, one could consider them, potentially, as sensationalist, in the sense that they have very graphic orifices, they have appendages. . .

I was just trying to do honest things in terms of a fascination with human bodies. Have one and watch them. And I completely reject any association with porn or anything like that, because it’s just not my interest. As I’ve told people for years, images that involve women for me have more to do with the idea that everyone has a mother than any idea of ​​sexuality per se. And the images of men that involve pairs of humans having fun, it has as much to do with my experience of riding horses with my brother. At least on a conscious level, it has nothing to do with sex.

Is it because, for the painting to have something to do with sex or pornography, it would have to try to titillate, and these images aren’t interested in that?

If you can find me a kid somewhere who jerks off looking at pictures of my paintings, I’d love to meet them. But I find that highly unlikely. [Laughs.] It’s just not the zone. There’s nothing about it in what the paintings look like or the intent behind them, as far as I can see. And I’m not saying that to be dishonest. Our culture has relegated thinking about the human body to pretty scary realms, but art has been around for a very long time and the human body has been a subject since the beginning.

But what’s interesting about your work is that it can also be scary, not in a sexual way, exactly, but in the way that watching it confronts us with something that we don’t necessarily think about. When we sit here, engaged with each other’s bodies, the way we do on the subway, or in a family, there is a concerted repression. Thoughts about people’s protruding penises or their orifices are not things that come to mind.

I completely agree. I think it’s right. But that’s how I see art, I guess. Art allows things that we don’t use in our daily social space to understand each other, to categorize themselves. Art is a kind of free zone. I see things that I find much more provocative on the sides of buses here in New York than in my own work. And maybe that means I’m blind to the effect of what I’m doing.

]]>
Pichwai paintings: Yugdeepak Soni’s contact with the divine https://cuimingda.com/pichwai-paintings-yugdeepak-sonis-contact-with-the-divine/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 09:09:50 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/pichwai-paintings-yugdeepak-sonis-contact-with-the-divine/ Indradhanush, an exhibition of paintings from the Pichwai tradition by Yugdeepak Soni, crosses the realms of fantasy, culture and craftsmanship Indradhanush, an exhibition of paintings from the Pichwai tradition by Yugdeepak Soni, crosses the realms of fantasy, culture and craftsmanship At the end of the 16th century, the frontier regions of Mewar were a savage […]]]>

Indradhanush, an exhibition of paintings from the Pichwai tradition by Yugdeepak Soni, crosses the realms of fantasy, culture and craftsmanship

Indradhanush, an exhibition of paintings from the Pichwai tradition by Yugdeepak Soni, crosses the realms of fantasy, culture and craftsmanship

At the end of the 16th century, the frontier regions of Mewar were a savage country inhabited by warring tribes and weary travelers on the old caravan routes that snaked around the Thar Desert. But its heart, a few hundred miles to the south, was dotted with lakes, and the colorful landscape where only wind-blown acacia trees remained gave way to verdant valleys, forests and ancient wells where bulls drew water. ‘water.

Here, in what is now the district of Rajsamand, was raised the Shrinathji Temple at Nathdwara, a center of pilgrimage for Vaishnavites and the birthplace of the pichwai tradition of painting. The paintings, mostly of Krishna with large eyes and a stocky build, earned their name because they hung behind the deity ( yell-behind, going-hang). Over the next four centuries, the Pichwai came to encompass various themes – the Ras Lila, Jain folklore, the pantheon of Hindu gods, the Hanuman Chalisa, scenes of court life and local flora and fauna – though it is Shrinathji as cowherd, holding Mount Govardhan and appearing to his devotees who still holds the fort.

Yugdeepak Soni at Pichwai Workshop

Yugdeepak Soni at the Pichwai workshop | Photo credit: special arrangement

In a workshop as part of Indradhanush, an exhibition of Pichwai paintings, artist Yugdeepak Soni breaks through the cultural distance of this art form, drawing the outline of a woman on a handmade sheet of paper. hand after rubbing it with onyx. The figure is characteristic of the Mewar school, drawn in profile with almond-shaped eyes and a pointed nose. Soni fills in the colors of her skirt and bodice, line by line, using a fine-tipped brush, with the practiced ease of a painter who has spent years mastering form.

The swaroop virat of Lord Vishnu, a pichwai painting by Yugdeepak Soni

The swaroop virate of Lord Vishnu, a pichwai painting by Yugdeepak Soni | Photo credit: special arrangement

“My introduction to Pichwai came after I dropped out of school. I was sent to Bhilwara for a few years, to the house of my maternal uncle who had learned from my great-grandfather, the famous Badri Lal Chitrakar I felt comfortable with the brush, learning from the best how to make pigments, technique, how to play with colors, find inspiration and most importantly feel joy in pursuing it. has joy in you, the colors will find you,” says Soni, who now lives in Udaipur. “I’ve been painting for two decades, but I’m still learning. a single job takes months.Reading folklore, mythology, and observing cultural events helps ground the art, though some of the inspiration on how to apply the style comes from previous works.

Painted mostly on cotton cloth, muslin, or handmade paper, over time Pichwai evolved from temples to opulent salons and the raag-bhog-shringar (music, food and jewelry for the deity) to handcrafted vignettes of rural Rajasthan. The exhibition features 55 of Soni’s works, some painted during the pandemic, with a range of brushes and colors. “For the eyes and eyebrows, the single bristle squirrel tail brush is used, while the mongoose bristle brush is used for thicker lines,” Soni explains, adding that he uses indigo paints, metals and minerals and gold leaf, in particular. while performing Mughal and Rajput styles.

The paintings come in a variety of sizes, with the fabric panels being larger, and the paper ones more cluttered with elements. Banana trees hold their ground in a sea of ​​other trees, peacocks frolic as gray-blue-white monsoon clouds weave their way through a looping indigo sky, cows trot through the landscape and also line the well-defined borders while the women dance with dreamlike intensity.

The hanging display allows the viewer to engage with the painting and contemplate the detail of the artist’s steady hand. Ripe, rounded colors fill them, held back only by geometric precision. Fillers, like chattrisboats, lotuses and orchards are scattered in strange spaces respecting the theme.

Soni says he prefers to work during the day because the colors come out better in the sunlight. Among the canvases that stand out are Krishna Leela, filled with rows of dancers in gay abandon with Krishna taking center stage and Gopastami who has cows with his chin up gazing at Shrinathji. A towering cosmic Vishnu in midnight blue filled with mythical scenes, Soni’s favorite (Utsava) which has plump seated women on lotuses and cows on leaf pads around Shrinathji; elephants struggling with their trunks clasped in their arms, the gold of their clanking chains glittering in the light of the gallery; and the Gangaur festival, women gazing out of latticed windows as a parade of boats filled with men in bright pink turbans pass the ghat paying homage to the maharana, are a few that stand out.

Each of these settings is ethereal encompassing a world that oscillates between the spiritual and the cultural, much like the myriad landscapes of Mewar.

The exhibition is open Monday to Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Forum Art Gallery, 57, 5th Street Padmanabha Nagar, Adyar, until April 8. For more details call 8778726960.

]]>
Paintings by Anne Carney Raines inspired by Las Vegas and casino architecture https://cuimingda.com/paintings-by-anne-carney-raines-inspired-by-las-vegas-and-casino-architecture/ Wed, 30 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/paintings-by-anne-carney-raines-inspired-by-las-vegas-and-casino-architecture/ To him, Las Vegas is a place of replicas and cartoonish copies, from the first-floor canals of “Venice” to the cute cobblestone streets of “Paris”; all temperature controlled and lit by constant levels of artificial light. In her new exhibition at London’s Wilder Gallery, Pleasure Zones, Raines explores this notion of fictional space to evoke […]]]>

To him, Las Vegas is a place of replicas and cartoonish copies, from the first-floor canals of “Venice” to the cute cobblestone streets of “Paris”; all temperature controlled and lit by constant levels of artificial light. In her new exhibition at London’s Wilder Gallery, Pleasure Zones, Raines explores this notion of fictional space to evoke simultaneous feelings of entrapment and seduction. She constructs complex environments that expose the artifice of painting through the visual language of theater and scenography.

The title of the exhibit is taken from Learning From Las Vegas, the 1972 book by Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour that played a pivotal role in the development of postmodern architectural principles.



© Anne Carney Raines

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

This seminal work considers places such as Las Vegas, Disneyland, shopping malls and botanical gardens as “pleasure zones”. As the authors put it: “Lightness, the quality of being an oasis in a possibly hostile context, heightened symbolism and the ability to engulf the visitor in a new role are essential to the imagery of architecture of the pleasure zone. Raines is particularly interested in the image of the oasis as a cultivated or built-up area, offering a form of escape for members of society.

It is a fascinating concept and beautifully showcased in this exhibition. Overall, Pleasure Zones is a triumph for the burgeoning artist, who has been championed by Jay Jopling’s daughter, Angelica Jopling with Incubator 21, is a Bloomberg New Contemporary x2, and also has a group show with India Rose James at Soho Revue.

Drawing on his background as a scenic painter, Raines constructs complex environments that shed new light on the artifice of painting through the visual language of theater and set design. His art investigates the relationship between interior and exterior spaces; mountains, gardens and trees follow one another in a series of painted panels, curtains and openings, evoking the collective memory of the landscapes.

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

Many Pleasure Zones works include images of landscapes, from gardens and arable fields to forests and mountainsides. Raines draws attention to the illusion of ‘nature’ and the mediated relationship we have with the more than human world. Many of us consume depictions of landscapes more frequently than we encounter actual ones; we live among artificial iterations and versions of ecosystems, pleasure zones carefully simulating our favorite elements of the external environment.

Topiary mazes appear as repeated patterns throughout the show. In topiary gardening, nature is carefully controlled; sculpted trees are used to hide and reveal views of the landscape, manipulating how visitors move through a space. They play a similar role in the paintings, repeatedly baffling and redirecting the viewer’s eye. Raines’ labyrinths are both dreamlike and nightmarish, evoking the conflicting fear and fantasy of getting lost.

His work is firmly situated within its art-historical context, particularly addressing the tradition of landscape painting in which images of “nature” are aesthetically constructed with architectural precision. She also draws on trompe l’oeil, a type of painting located in the gray zone between fine arts and decorative arts.

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

© Anne Carney Raines



© Anne Carney Raines

Interested in the qualities of paint as a medium, Raines repeatedly plays with the artificiality and two-dimensionality of the picture plane. She creates layers of paints within paints, reveling in the technical process of depicting one flat painted surface within another flat painted surface, breaking the fourth wall through her meta-theatrical illusions and inviting the viewer to get lost in her fictional worlds.

Pleasure Zones is on display at the Wilder Gallery in London until April 1, 2022. For more from the artist, visit annecarneyraines.com.

]]>
Xinyi Cheng’s sensual paintings explore the complexities of intimacy https://cuimingda.com/xinyi-chengs-sensual-paintings-explore-the-complexities-of-intimacy/ Tue, 29 Mar 2022 09:13:04 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/xinyi-chengs-sensual-paintings-explore-the-complexities-of-intimacy/ Chinese artist Xinyi Cheng telescopes interpersonal relationships. His exhibition Seen through others — presented at Lafayette Anticipations in Paris (March 23-28, 2022) — brings together around thirty works produced between 2016 and 2021, featuring characters with impenetrable expressions placed in enigmatic contexts. His characters brandish lit cigarettes, sport stylish mustaches, lollygag in leopard-print leggings, show […]]]>

Chinese artist Xinyi Cheng telescopes interpersonal relationships. His exhibition Seen through others — presented at Lafayette Anticipations in Paris (March 23-28, 2022) — brings together around thirty works produced between 2016 and 2021, featuring characters with impenetrable expressions placed in enigmatic contexts. His characters brandish lit cigarettes, sport stylish mustaches, lollygag in leopard-print leggings, show off stray nipples, and dip their fingers in wine glasses. She highlights the friction between itchy toes with the same interest she applies to searching lips. Yet when she portrays physical closeness, you never know how much of a genuine intimacy that conveys. The dim lighting and featureless backgrounds of his paintings are suspended in any particular present, ambiguous and devoid of obvious signifiers.

Xinyi studied sculpture in Beijing, then painting in Baltimore, followed by a residency program in Amsterdam before moving to Paris, where she has been based for four years. Her work has recently been the subject of group exhibitions at the Pinault Foundation — alongside Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Claire Tabouret and Kerry James Marshall — and the group exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo Antibody.

Standing in the middle of his paintings – namely a naked blond man capsizing in red kayakand two skinny white dogs paddling in Swimmers — we spoke to Xinyi just before the opening of her new show Paris.

How do you land on the micro-moments that are worth extracting and fixing? Do you recognize a valuable moment as it occurs? Or is it what stays with you?
I always have my iPhone with me, and whenever I feel like taking a picture, I always do. Over time, I revisit the photos I have taken. From everyday objects or moments, I want something specific. In the still lifes I’ve done, everything represents people so much [the items belong to]. The new direction I want to take is to work more with my imagination than with photographs. I still need photography as a tool to capture things, but I want [to pursue something] more unreal.

The title of the exhibition refers to Virginia Woolf. Does reading influence your painting?When I paint something, the ideas are small and I look for meaning while I’m doing it, so sometimes reading helps me understand what I’m doing, rather than inspiring me. But I’m a very visual person. I am inspired by encounters, or I turn to other paintings to make me want to paint. I always love watching Otto Dix. I like how he painted the details – how he layered the paint.

A man on a sofa without pants, wearing a leather jacket by Xinyi Cheng

Dix has such darkness. Would you describe your work as dark?
Yeah, I want something to bother. I think if I can really get closer [to something dark], It’s really interesting. I think it’s somewhere dangerous. I want to take up this challenge.

Why is it dangerous?
Because making a bad painting is a failure. So there is danger there.

What East bad paint? Do you have work that you’re not showing, or can you still fix your work?
I still want to fix the paint; I’m really not going to throw anything away. I think, sometimes, I know this painting can’t really be a awesome painting, but I just want it to be above mediocrity.

When I start, I often wonder if this image – this idea – is interesting enough. Going through the process is quite a commitment, and I don’t want to give up.

You have lived in several countries. How did the location influence your aesthetic or your process? Has it evolved as you have changed locations or has the painting not been changed by where you are?
I’m probably influenced by where I am, but I don’t know how to talk about it. I live in Paris and the weather is really nice there, beautiful light. And I can go to the Louvre. Visual experiences are very important to me. I can’t just breathe the air without absorbing my surroundings.

painting of two people kissing by Xinyi Cheng

I read that you have seen several exhibitions to think creatively about yours. You mentioned going to the Georgia O’Keeffe show at the Center Pompidou. What other exhibitions have marked your preparation process?
I really loved Josef and Anni Albers’ show. It was so beautiful: I went there four times. I also went to the Goya exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler in Basel.

How did those visits translate into what you did next?
I don’t think it’s a direct translation; it puts me in a state of mind. I like a painting by Watteau in the 18th century gallery at the Louvre – I like the way he painted that white suit. When I did “Midday Troubles”, I really went to the Louvre to see how he painted. It is therefore a direct translation. But sometimes I really wanted to see a big picture and feel uplifted.

You use photography as a work tool. Would you ever consider your photography an art form in itself?
I think so. There are pictures in my catalog. Have you seen these postcards? There are like five postcards inserted at random. These are my photographic works. I want to develop it… I don’t know how, but I keep thinking about it. I only use my iPhone because it’s fast; I don’t want to think too much about technique.

a painting of bare feet falling in a whirlwind by Xinyi Cheng

A subject represented is your boyfriend. Another is a portrait – three versions of the same friend with different body hair over time. Are the subjects always someone around you?
I paint the people around me – I need to know the person. Because when I start a painting, it means that I spend many hours looking at it: I need to think about this person, I need to relate to this person. That’s why I can’t paint celebrities because I don’t have a personal entry point into that person’s life. For “Incroyable (En Route)”, it is a journey: I painted Thomas on [a period of] ten years.

As for naming the paintings, do you always do that after they’re finished? Or do you tend to have a name and then find a visual to go with it?
Sometimes I have a word in my head very early on, even before I start painting. But there are also times when I can’t find a good title, I have to ship a painting or it goes to a publisher, and I just have to find something. So it depends. Ideally, I really want the title to add a new dimension — but also something that doesn’t really explain the painting. I want people to feel like this could be a twist on something else.

You have been in Paris for four years and have some French titles; How does the local language influence you?
I don’t speak French really well, so I still have my fantasy about Paris. I look at people but I don’t know what [exchanges are about]. Because I don’t really know what’s going on, their expressions, their gestures seem so present and so expressive. I always have to imagine what’s going on – I think that gap is what interests me.

A painting of a woman in a fur coat smoking by Xinyi Cheng

It makes you a keen observer of other communications – it’s interesting. In the catalog you express your concern about repetition, but then at some point you acknowledge that you are just attracted to certain things. Would you say he’s getting comfortable with obsession?
I was really afraid of repeating myself and being boring. But I went to Norway last year and saw paintings by Edvard Munch. I think I made peace with myself when I saw that he kept coming back to the same subject – you even have almost the same compositions. I was thinking maybe it’s okay, maybe in my life I will also be interested in very specific things. And every time I do them, I know it’s not the same: I want to do something new, and it always makes sense to me. So I don’t want that to be a burden or keep me from thinking about what I want to say.

It’s true – and it draws on the idea of ​​”seen through others”, the way another’s gaze shapes the way we act.
Exactly.

a painting of horses swimming in water by Xinyi Cheng

So you think it’s mostly a burden, this idea of ​​being seen through others? Or does it validate?
I didn’t really think about it in my paintings. But I’m very interested in people. Ultimately, I’d like to know what’s going on in their heads, I’d like to know their inner life — but I don’t think I can ever do that. Inner life and public appearance and how these two manifest and are perceived…

Would you say you are skeptical of the possibility of a connection?
I think there is no way not to be skeptical. Only in a book by Virginia Woolf could we hear monologues from other people’s heads. I think there are limits to the accessible parts of everyone’s life. But it is okay. I also imagine them and then they become characters.

Would you say you are drawn to youth culture, or does a specific generation characterize your work?
I do not know. I’m curious how I’m going to paint an older person, or how I’m going to paint as I get older. A friend, who is in “Midday Troubles” (2021) has a truly ageless face. I’m very attracted to that. I don’t see it as a generation though. As in ten years, we have all changed so much. It’s more than I follow the trip.

Follow iD on Instagram and TikTok for more art.

Credits


All paintings by Xinyi Cheng

]]>
Red Velvet Becomes Muse Of Classic Painting For “Feel My Rhythm” MV https://cuimingda.com/red-velvet-becomes-muse-of-classic-painting-for-feel-my-rhythm-mv/ Tue, 22 Mar 2022 11:03:15 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/red-velvet-becomes-muse-of-classic-painting-for-feel-my-rhythm-mv/ If the concept isn’t creepy and enchanting at any point, is it really a Red Velvet music video? Red Velvet finally made their highly anticipated comeback with their latest EP, “The ReVe Festival 2022 – Feel My Rhythm” on March 21, 2022 at 6 p.m. KST. The mini-album is the quintet’s first release for the […]]]>

If the concept isn’t creepy and enchanting at any point, is it really a Red Velvet music video?

Red Velvet finally made their highly anticipated comeback with their latest EP, “The ReVe Festival 2022 – Feel My Rhythm” on March 21, 2022 at 6 p.m. KST. The mini-album is the quintet’s first release for the year, following their EP “Queendom” in August 2021. The album’s release was accompanied by the music video for its title track, “Feel My Rhythm.”

The EP is also a continuation of the girl group’s 2019 music festival concept and trilogy – featuring “ReVe” as a play on Red Velvet’s name, as well as French for “rêve” and “fantasy”. “. At the time of writing, “The ReVe Festival 2022 – Feel My Rhythm” is Red Velvet’s best-selling album, making it a half-million seller.

With six songs from different genres, “The ReVe Festival 2022 – Feel My Rhythm” is an R&B treat for your ears, especially with Red Velvet’s amazing vocals. The EP’s lead single, “Feel My Rhythm”, is a pop song sampling Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Air on the G String” with intense trap beats and string melodies. The lyrics tell the story of a fun journey, traveling freely through space and time while listening to the song.

The music video, in particular, had ReVeluvs on the edge of their seats. The girls are seen taking on the look and paying homage to classic paintings, adding to their pristine and untouchable unique concepts.

The ReVeluvs are still impressed with the release of Red Velvet’s latest EP and music video. Even before the release of the EP, Red Velvet skyrocketed in social media trending topics. Following the release, a number of hashtags and topics related to them, including “#RedVelvetComeBach”, “Red Velvet is Bach”, and many more.

If you’re not sure why it’s “Bach” instead of “back,” it’s because of the girl group’s use of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Air on the G String.” Additionally, it was mentioned during their press conference that SM Entertainment deliberately timed Red Velvet’s comeback to coincide with Bach’s birthday.

Red Velvet is truly an untouchable K-Pop group. Congratulations to our half a million (and counting!) sellers!

Other POP! stories you might like:

Red Velvet’s Comeback Concept Proves They’re ‘Concept Queens’

Reveluvs are overwhelmed with news of Red Velvet’s activities for March

Get the latest POP! You have received information in your inbox

]]>
Rosie’s Fascinating Paintings and Belfast’s Ring of Steel Reborn https://cuimingda.com/rosies-fascinating-paintings-and-belfasts-ring-of-steel-reborn/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 12:52:10 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/rosies-fascinating-paintings-and-belfasts-ring-of-steel-reborn/ Rosie’s McGurran is no stranger to this column with her groundbreaking exposure experience at Féile an Phobail catapulting her into her first professionally written review and numerous opportunities both at home and abroad. She has a new online exhibition with Gallery 545 featuring a series of paintings inspired by the people and places of Belfast, […]]]>

Rosie’s McGurran is no stranger to this column with her groundbreaking exposure experience at Féile an Phobail catapulting her into her first professionally written review and numerous opportunities both at home and abroad.

She has a new online exhibition with Gallery 545 featuring a series of paintings inspired by the people and places of Belfast, moments of growth and transformation in her life and imaginary characters. Suspended between reality and fantasy, the works tell stories of the past – of life in the city and of the artist, but above all stories of a timeless imaginary world.

“In these paintings, realistic characters and familiar places combine or alternate with characters and views of a fantasy world,” explains gallery owner Francesca Bondi. as self-centered, independent or contained. All of the works have illustrative or theatrical qualities, enticing the viewer to read or create stories recounting the lives and adventures of these captivating female figures.

These paintings are a new direction for Rosie who is usually based in Roundstone but has returned to Belfast during lockdown – gazing at the city with new eyes suspended between reality and memory. It’s a bit like many of us living in the city who have experienced a lot of things that we remember but see the landscape of the city changing around us on a daily basis.

3Gallery

WILD SENSATION: “We All Gathered” by Rosie McGurran

Imagine if you could how it could look like a work of art?

Rosie’s exhibition at Gallery 545 opens to the public at Blick Studios 51 Malone Road from Saturday 26 March to 10 April.

Meanwhile, to mark 50 years since the construction of the lifeline known as the “Ring of Steel” around Belfast city centre, Kabosh, in collaboration with Professor Kate Catterall from the University of Texas, will present “Drawing the Ring of Steel” on Thursday, March 24 from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

THE WAY WE WERE: Security barriers in Callender Street where shoppers were searched before being allowed into the city center

3Gallery

THE WAY WE WERE: Security barriers in Callender Street where shoppers were searched before being allowed into the city center

Taking place at each of the former main ‘Ring of Steels’ entry and exit points in and out of Belfast city center – Donegall Place, Royal Avenue, Castle Street and High Street – this free 12-hour theatrical event aims to use one of the few culturally mutual experiences of the conflict to facilitate storytelling between communities and between generations.

For those of us who have memories of these barriers, there will be people ready to record any memories you would like to share. Actors in 70s costume will recreate the movements that happened in the spaces.

Paula McFetridge, creative director of Kabosh, says ‘Drawing the Ring of Steel’ aims to highlight how Belfast city center has developed since that time into an inclusive shared space.

“This will ensure that the stories of the older generation are heard and preserved and will help younger generations and those with no ‘Ring of Steel’ experience to appreciate both the journey that has been made and the distance that we have yet to go,” she says.

Finally, the imagine Belfast festival continues this week and the UK Creativity team have launched a call for paid staff to work on the Our Place in Space project taking place on Divis and Black Mountain in June (and featured in the column of last week). You can email the Nerve Center organizers for more information.

Do you have anything to say on this issue?
If so, why not send a letter to the editor via this link?

]]>