Fantasy paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 12:18:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cuimingda.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-25T191724.119-150x150.png Fantasy paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ 32 32 Majestic paintings by Omar Ba grapple with European colonialism in Africa https://cuimingda.com/majestic-paintings-by-omar-ba-grapple-with-european-colonialism-in-africa/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/majestic-paintings-by-omar-ba-grapple-with-european-colonialism-in-africa/ Omar Ba’s haunting mixed-media paintings situate hybrid figures of animals and humans in fantastical scenes. They evoke the beyond of European colonialism in Africa. Ba constructs most of his large-scale works on the floor, layering paint, pencil, India ink, and Bic pen ink on predominantly black backgrounds. Dense layers of disparate material add great depth […]]]>

Omar Ba’s haunting mixed-media paintings situate hybrid figures of animals and humans in fantastical scenes. They evoke the beyond of European colonialism in Africa. Ba constructs most of his large-scale works on the floor, layering paint, pencil, India ink, and Bic pen ink on predominantly black backgrounds. Dense layers of disparate material add great depth and texture to Ba’s fantasy worlds, which ask viewers to grapple with the serious stories that shaped them.

Ba’s career took off this year. After creating an award-winning presentation at the 14th Dakar Biennale, the artist mounted a solo exhibition, “Droit du sol – Droit de rêver”, which inaugurates the New York location of Templon (which represents the artist with Hales Gallery). . In the show, the Senegalese-born artist, based in Dakar and New York, presents new visions of the African diaspora to his American audience.

The artist’s success in the secondary market is growing as well, with sales matching – although soon expected to exceed – his primary market numbers. Earlier this month at The Armory Show, Templon sold Ba’s works for prices between $17,000 and $200,000. At Christie’s Paris live auction “A Look at the World: Collection Comte & Comtesse Jean-Jacques de Flers” in September, two of Ba’s works sold for more than double their high estimate: purebred dog (2012) sold for €47,880 ($47,177), well above its estimate of €15,000 to €20,000 ($14,784 to $19,712); and Facial Offense #4 (2013) sold for €27,720 ($27,361), far exceeding its high estimate of €12,000 ($11,844).

Ba is a graduate of the National School of Fine Arts in Dakar and the Superior School of Fine Arts in Geneva. He developed a distinctive style by fusing elements of Euro-American painting with stories from traditional Senegalese folklore. Ba’s work suggests that storytelling allows artists to dramatize events and horrors beyond their control. This allows them to create new narratives that transcend entrenched institutional truisms.

The house of exile (2022), for example, features an individual wearing a black surgical mask. His head and torso are human, while his legs are all horseback – he is reminiscent of the mythical centaur. A black figure appears amid beams of light, evoking an all-powerful deity. The character seems to sow the land, but we don’t know if he reaps the benefits: a nod to local labor in a colonized environment. Ba textures the composition with her distinctive sponge marks. Other works like I’m talking about immigration and Tell us about the United States of Africa (both from 2022) offer pointed commentary on the displacement caused by Euro-American colonialism.

Ba works on enormous scales and at extraordinary speeds. He produced most of the 30 works exhibited on the floor of the Templon gallery in the weeks leading up to its official opening in early September.

In less than a month, Ba has created a moving mythological tribute to those who fled their birthplace or faced institutional violence in their home country. The artist honors their stories and transforms them into monumental memories. Ba’s tender outlook is especially evident in large-scale projects Duty of memory (2022), which features two seated shirtless figures who wear shorts, sunglasses, and golden wings. Ba’s majestic African figures soar above the violent and superficial portrayals of diaspora figures that have for too long dominated Western art.

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Issy Wood’s hypnotic paintings reveal the dark side of femininity https://cuimingda.com/issy-woods-hypnotic-paintings-reveal-the-dark-side-of-femininity/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:37:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/issy-woods-hypnotic-paintings-reveal-the-dark-side-of-femininity/ Issy Wood’s paintings function like a mercurial Tumblr moodboard from the early 2010s. Written in a stream-of-consciousness style, the works seem both intimate and deeply impersonal. Conveyed with a deft painterly hand, Wood’s style is both a play on Pop Art and Surrealism. With a focus on mundane household objects, Wood’s paintings and the trance-like […]]]>

Issy Wood’s paintings function like a mercurial Tumblr moodboard from the early 2010s. Written in a stream-of-consciousness style, the works seem both intimate and deeply impersonal. Conveyed with a deft painterly hand, Wood’s style is both a play on Pop Art and Surrealism. With a focus on mundane household objects, Wood’s paintings and the trance-like state in which objects, like a gold tooth or a brown leather trench coat, appear, leave viewers wondering if he is it real life or just fantasy.

Born in Dunham, North Carolina, Wood grew up in a family of doctors in London, where she is now based. Perhaps his upbringing helps explain the analytical eye that Wood uses in his paintings. A work on display until November 12 in his first New York solo exhibition “Time Sensitive” at the Michael Werner Gallery, which co-represents the artist with Carlos/Ishikawa, depicts an open mouth viewed from the side to reveal a wound on the gums. Title Painful rewards 1 (2022), the image is both luscious and grotesque. The clinical point of view mimics the perspective of a dentist when examining a crown, but the intimacy of a potential turn to an illness of an unknown nature manifests in viewers an unease with anything medical.

Holder of an MA from the Royal Academy in London, Wood, now aged 29, enjoys an interdisciplinary achievement incomparable to her peers. She is both a rising figurative painter with an active secondary market, as well as a musician – her first album my body your choice was released independently earlier this month. Wood’s careers in the art world and the music industry intertwine in her ability to find and portray femininity in otherwise masculine objects.

In her music video for “Both” (2022), directed by Lena Dunham, Wood paints common designs, like a clock, on actress Hari Nef’s body. The same object appears in the corners of the dark muted paint Idea for a playing card (2022), which depicts a pink sink at its center. This painting, not included in “Time Sensitive,” is a pretty image with an eerie undertone that leaves viewers wondering why anyone would be obsessed with time-consuming activities around a sink. Candid about her history with eating disorders, Wood subtly nods in the painting to the tools or spaces that cause and enable purging.

The clock is a common theme in “Time Sensitive”, as it evokes both a Alice in Wonderland– like escaping into the dream world, but also our strange relationship to time in the digital age where time can easily be wasted with social media, emails and text messages. As Wood puts it in the accompanying exhibition catalog, “What does ‘of life’ mean even today?”

The tension also resides in other works. The scary big Roger Sterling with his future ex-wife (2022) features a cropped detail from the TV show Mad Men (2007–15). The painting depicts an older businessman leaning down to kiss a younger woman who is adorned with diamonds and gems. Although the reference image is taken from a fictional script, the scene evokes the kinds of leaked footage that now commonly plagues our public figures. The idea that damning revelations exist for almost all powerful people is reiterated by Wood in a track titled “Monica Lewinsky” on her latest album.

And just like that, Wood vividly traps viewers in the next vignette – an enlarged detail of a DialPak container with birth control pills in it. Wrong (2022). The contrast is enough to give the audience a boost while also setting the tone for how Wood communicates emotions. Like moodboards and memes, Wood’s work demonstrates how sophisticated our intuitive interpretation is in everyday communication, rendering explicit narrative plots unnecessary. Wood’s paintings are powerful on their own not only for the artist’s skillful skill as a draughtswoman, but also for her preservation of images that say so much without saying anything at all.

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Hugo McCloud turns plastic bags into blooming paintings on invisible labor https://cuimingda.com/hugo-mccloud-turns-plastic-bags-into-blooming-paintings-on-invisible-labor/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/hugo-mccloud-turns-plastic-bags-into-blooming-paintings-on-invisible-labor/ Art Osman Can Yerebakan Portrait of Hugo McCloud with his work at Rockefeller Center. Courtesy of Rockefeller Center. “Don’t let darkness be a recurring theme,” Hugo McCloud was continually reminded as he worked on his solo presentation with the Sean Kelly Gallery at this year’s Armory Show and his upcoming exhibition at Vielmetter Los Angeles. […]]]>

Art

Osman Can Yerebakan

Portrait of Hugo McCloud with his work at Rockefeller Center. Courtesy of Rockefeller Center.

“Don’t let darkness be a recurring theme,” Hugo McCloud was continually reminded as he worked on his solo presentation with the Sean Kelly Gallery at this year’s Armory Show and his upcoming exhibition at Vielmetter Los Angeles. His latest figurative paintings, titled “flores de mayo” variations, will be on display in the Focus section of the New York fair September 9-11, while the Vielmetter exhibit will feature new versions of early career stamp paintings. by McCloud.

“The background the paintings come from may be dark, but my images are not,” he told Artsy from his Los Angeles studio, where McCloud recently moved after residing in Tulum. in Mexico. The protagonists of his Armory presentation underlie this visual optimism. Flowers, particularly those the artist has photographed on the handcarts of vendors in Mexico, are the subject of paintings that challenge the natural essence of botany through McCloud’s choice of artificial materials. Single-use plastic bags replace the established order of paint to capture the exalted hues and velvety lushness of flowers.

Layering pieces of plastic in soft arrangements, McCloud orchestrates bouquets with silhouettes of trees in the background. The understated elegance of the flowers silently addresses the flawed commercial network through which McCloud obtained the plastic bags. “They still carry the weight of individuals pushing them on tricycles,” the artist added, commenting on the invisible work veiled beneath the floral beauty. “But my approach is a bit more on the border of abstraction now, creating my own language with plastic.”

Entering quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic has given the artist a better understanding of the different ideas that interest him. The work has always been a subject, whether through its immediate and practical relationship with the canvas (or once with objects like a designer), or its observations of others working on the streets of India or Europe. South Africa.

Hugo McCloud, installation view of “Palindrome” at Sean Kelly, 2015. Photo by Jason Wyche. Courtesy of the artist and Sean Kelly, New York.

“I come from a family of workers, from my grandfather who came to America and opened a junkyard or from my mother who is a landscaper,” he explained. “I have always been humbled by individuals who try to create more with less.” The stamp paintings that put it on the map less than a decade ago included materials used for roofing. “I started by frequenting supply stores to acquire industrial materials to make art,” he recalls. The material inspiration for his abstract paintings on aluminum in “Palindrome”, his first exhibition at the Sean Kelly Gallery in 2015, is the fruit of his encounter with slums in Johannesburg.

A similar curiosity for the forgotten also guided McCloud to the material for which he is perhaps best known today. Single-use polypropylene bags first appeared on the streets of India in 2013. The material did not cooperate for nearly four years until it understood the chemical language of plastic.

McCloud began collecting discarded sacks on the streets to make paintings of anonymous individuals pushing, carrying, or driving masses of goods, also on the streets. Iconography came to him around 2017 when he rented a 300 square foot studio across from street vendors in Mexico City. “I’m not focusing on that exact individual,” McCloud said of his characters’ anonymity. “My focus is on the process and the willingness of the individual to do what it takes to work that day – there’s beauty and strength in that.”

In addition to their socio-political connotation, the piles of bags alongside the human figure offer the artist the pictorial challenge of imbuing unwanted material with emotion and intrigue. McCloud found himself captivated by “the value of the overlooked”, as he described it, and eventually expanded his investigation of the material on a larger scale.

Hugo McCloud, installation view of Man’s Burden: Waiting to Breathe, 2021, presented by Sean Kelly and Vielmetter Los Angeles at Art Basel Unlimited, 2021. © Hugo McCloud. Courtesy of the artist and Sean Kelly, New York.

At last year’s Art Basel in Switzerland, the Sean Kelly Gallery exhibited the four-panel 90-by-282-inch painting Man’s Burden: Waiting to Breathe With (2021). Given McCloud’s later foray into still lifes, the work hints at a departure from figuration by providing a more abstract visual lexicon.

And at Rockefeller Center last April, McCloud again began juxtaposing street workers in his biggest public exhibit yet. Given Midtown’s complex relationship to class division and labor, McCloud’s Art Production Fund exhibition of anonymous workers from remote areas rendered in disposable bags epitomized the intricacies of global economies.

Portrait of Hugo McCloud at Rockefeller Center. Courtesy of Rockefeller Center.

“I’m not the painter people imagine – I don’t paint with a brush on a canvas with an easel,” he said. “I deal with materials by discovering engineering and proposing my own technique.” This path, however, requires compromise and patience. “Plastic is a material like no other because there’s no fluidity – it’s unforgiving and very fixed,” McCloud continued. Once ironed over the panel, the plastic strip offers no turning back. Therefore, each painting must stem from a premeditated decision as to its balance between pointed figuration and hints of abstraction. “I’m still trying to figure out how to capture fluidity,” McCloud admitted.

His new works “flores de mayo” which present trees in silhouette imposed this challenge: “My trees are the same color as the sky because they are vague and undefined shadows, so I realize that the key is to create another layer of sky but darker.” said the artist. Through her use of materials, McCloud has proven that other possibilities of beauty can be discovered in what most consider disposable.

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Anouk Lamm Anouk’s Sensual and Meditative Paintings Transcend Biography https://cuimingda.com/anouk-lamm-anouks-sensual-and-meditative-paintings-transcend-biography/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/anouk-lamm-anouks-sensual-and-meditative-paintings-transcend-biography/ Anouk Lamm Anouk often wears stylish sleepwear with their Yorkshire terrier, Sirius Grace Anouk, perched tenderly in their arms. “Since I was younger, I’ve always felt more comfortable communicating with animals,” said the 29-year-old Austrian artist. “They are pure in their intentions.” The outlines of lambs, cats and teddy bears are the main subjects of […]]]>

Anouk Lamm Anouk often wears stylish sleepwear with their Yorkshire terrier, Sirius Grace Anouk, perched tenderly in their arms. “Since I was younger, I’ve always felt more comfortable communicating with animals,” said the 29-year-old Austrian artist. “They are pure in their intentions.” The outlines of lambs, cats and teddy bears are the main subjects of Anouk’s early monochrome works on paper, an aesthetic that attracted the interest of institutions such as M+ in Hong Kong. “I now understand that it was related to my autism and the need for a quiet environment,” added Anouk, who was diagnosed with a neurological and developmental disorder earlier this year.

At Patricia Low Contemporary, the Gstaad-based gallery where Anouk’s solo exhibition “Lesbian Jazz: Meditating in the Alps” is on view until October 14, Anouk spoke with Artsy about their artistic practice and the fluidity of genres .. They first explored their non-binary identity in 2014 through photographic self-portraits which they sometimes modified, a form from which Anouk has since moved away completely. “My portraits helped me cope because I had the experience as a girl and a woman in society, but I never felt like one,” Anouk said. “When I was able to find my real body, I realized that I no longer needed to take pictures.” With a hysterectomy already completed and a mastectomy scheduled, Anouk is getting closer to showing on the outside what she feels on the inside.

It is this subtle, internal sense of being that Anouk instinctively projects into her work, particularly in the “Lesbian Jazz” series (2019-present), where female, hairless bodies are rendered in delicate lines, their nipples and powder pink genitalia on display in different states of arousal. Closer examination, however, reveals undefined bodies, such as a headless woman or a couple in erotic position with incomplete facial features. Painted on raw linen, which adds to the feeling of unfinished work, the figures are of textural quality.

Anouk has garnered increased attention in Austria in recent years. They received the Strabag Artaward International 2021, and for their subsequent exhibition, “Grace and Grave are only one Letter Apart”, Anouk created a life-size canvas horse and a pair of interlocking man-bear hybrids in gloss, quilted in tissue. Although soft sculptures are part of Anouk’s practice, their exhibition in Gstaad draws more attention to the space within the work rather than the way viewers move around it. .

In the “post/pre” abstract series (2019-present), there are empty circles and semi-circles, and elongated columns that fade and disappear. “I wanted to create a lot with minimal lines,” Anouk explained. “I found that the work becomes more complex this way.” Sometimes Anouk will incorporate a gold-filled sun, but mostly they suggest a sense of solidity in the void, a spherical unity that contrasts with gestural clouds, shadows, and watery strokes. There is an element of dreamy, meditative transcendence.

“The abstraction was always there with the void in everything that I don’t show,” Anouk said. “One day I had this image of light and mist that I wanted to create on canvas, which became my gateway into the world of abstraction.” While these thick, curvilinear lines contrast with the fainter evocations of Anouk’s figurative work, there is evidence of the abstract “post/pre” ethos in the shadow figures, halos, and chalky white globes. of “Lesbian Jazz”. The abstraction in this latter series could stem from a sense of restraint against the art of their lives. Anouk lives with their wife of two years and studio director, Marleen Roubik, and the artist’s work has been confused with the nature of this relationship.

“Post/pre” leaves more room for the spectator’s imagination, while the “Lesbian Jazz” series, by its title, narrows the notions of lesbian desire. Even if the latter is positioned within the framework of jazz as a fluid and improvised structure, the series seems to divert attention from alternative interpretations of eroticism. “I thought about nudes and lesbian identities, and from there I started combining and rearranging,” said the artist. “It’s freestyle in the sense that you don’t know what’s going to happen next.” Through these modular compositions, Anouk complicates the expressions of bodily desire. But all of the jazz-focused visual beats seem barely noticeable, drawing attention to the fact that naming the shape – in this case, jazz – doesn’t make it entirely visible.

However, the subject of the work sells. The paintings for “Lesbian Jazz: Meditating in the Alps” have already sold out – not bad for a debut in an alpine environment where the culture of art collecting is more focused on top notch artists and a few mega-galleries, namely Hauser & Wirth and Gagosian, the latter which just opened its outpost in Gstaad at the start of the year. With another solo show already scheduled for 2023 at Berlin’s powerhouse König Gallery, Anouk and their work are set to go even further.

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10 Great Movie Scenes That Subtly Recreated Famous Paintings https://cuimingda.com/10-great-movie-scenes-that-subtly-recreated-famous-paintings/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 16:03:15 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/10-great-movie-scenes-that-subtly-recreated-famous-paintings/ We often recommend media and products that we like. If you purchase something through links on our site, we may earn a commission. When one art form meets another, magical things can happen, and that’s especially true when a film pays homage to a famous painting by composing a scene in almost exactly the same […]]]>

We often recommend media and products that we like. If you purchase something through links on our site, we may earn a commission.

When one art form meets another, magical things can happen, and that’s especially true when a film pays homage to a famous painting by composing a scene in almost exactly the same way.

Whether it’s a subtle nod to a masterpiece or a feature film entirely dedicated to a painter’s masterpieces, here are several films that have recreated the look of famous paintings to infuse deeper meanings.

10. The Nightmare in Gothic (1986)

Gothic is far from the best film ever made, but critics can agree that its striking (and gruesome) visuals are what set it apart.

A weird, lowbrow horror that caters to cult fans, Gothic re-imagines the story of the Shelleys’ visit to Lord Byron and how Frankenstein was first written in 1818. So basically it’s about how the genre came about.

Ken Russell’s hallucinatory British horror wasn’t exactly hidden in his pastiche reference to Henry Fuseli’s painting The nightmare (1781). In fact, it was even on the movie poster!

Since the painting is considered a gothic classic, it was of course to make an appearance in a film literally titled Gothic!

9. In Prince Edward Island in Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Like all Wes Anderson movies, you can take a break Moonrise Kingdom at any time and be welcomed with a perfect setting. The splendid symmetry and precise color palettes of his films result in cinematic experiences that resemble two-hour moving paintings.

So why not throw a real painting in there? Moonrise Kingdom is a lovely pastel-colored learning tale in which two children decide to run away and live together in an island cove.

The most common screenshot you will find of Moonrise Kingdom shows Suzy (Kara Hayward) holding a pair of binoculars. The lush horizon is perfectly parallel to the frame on which she stands, pointing her gaze straight at us.

The scene echoes that of Alex Colville In Prince Edward Island (1965), a pointillist piece popular in the 1960s and depicting another little girl staring at us as the sea rolls behind her.

8. Napoleon crossing the Alps in Marie-Antoinette (2006)

Sofia Coppola clearly did a lot of research into the aesthetics of 18th century France for her film Marie Antoinette. Then she mixed it with her usual trademark style to give us a beautiful feminist romance drama.

Kirsten Dunst stars as the last queen of France before the French Revolution of 1789, leading a lavish existence that was terrible for the economy but brilliant to capture cinematically!

Although Napoleon Bonaparte is not in the film, Jamie Dornan appears on horseback as Count Fersen. The white horse, red cape, bicorn hat, and battle-ready posture are remarkably similar to Napoleon crossing the Alps by Jacques-Louis David (1801).

Sofia Coppola clearly has an artistic mind that considers every detail of every frame, especially this one.

7. The artist dying as a nymphomaniac (2013)

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With a title like Nymphomaniacyou probably wouldn’t expect it to refer to a classic Polish painting from the Victorian era.

The dying artist by Zygmunt Andrychiewicz (1901) depicts the dark scene of an artist asleep in his bed, unaware that death is sitting beside him. The fact that the skeleton man plays the violin makes it hauntingly beautiful.

Although the paint isn’t exactly erotic material, writer/director Lars von Trier successfully incorporated it into his controversial two-part film. It’s a subtle reference, but certainly noticeable enough for art fanatics.

Nymphomaniac is essentially a great morality piece, with Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) mirroring the dying artist and Seligman (Stellan Skarsgård) the immoral/deadly omen of darkness beside his bed.

6. Spoliarium at Heneral Luna (2015)

Spoliarium (1884) is the largest painting in the Philippines, imposing in size: 13.85 feet high by 25.2 feet wide.

A romantic oil canvas by Filipino painter Juan Luna, it served as an icon of Filipino nationalism, showing broken bodies being dragged across the bloodied stone floor.

Allan Paule plays said painter in General Luna, but that’s not really what the film is about. Director Jerrold Tarog focuses on the story of General Antonio Luna (John Arcilla), who was a key leader in the Philippine-American War.

The general’s brother, Juan Luna, may only play a small role in the film, but his influence extends everywhere. Behind the camera, cinematographer Pong Ignacio drew inspiration from many of Luna’s actual paintings as well as Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war film. paths of glory.

Western audiences may not have heard of General Lunabut it is one of the most expensive Filipino epic films ever made.

5. Wheat Field with Crows in Dreams (1990)

It was only time before Vincent van Gogh appeared in this article. Not only is Van Gogh one of the most famous painters in history, his visual style is incredibly fun to explore in movies.

Legendary Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa, best known for Rashomon and Seven Samurai— also has a passion for painting, hence his creation of a film as artistically whimsical as dreams.

dreams is made up of eight vignettes, each reenacting one of his many real-life dreams that Kurosawa repeatedly had.

The fifth part is titled Crows in direct reference to Van Gogh’s post-impressionist landscape of 1890 Wheat field with crows. In it, an art student stumbles into the world of Van Gogh himself, played (unexpectedly) by Martin Scorsese.

4. Saturn Devouring His Son in Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

The black paints was the name of the fourteen-part series by Francisco Goya, painted directly on the walls of his house in Madrid. Having lived in a country torn by war and serious illness, Goya translated his pessimism into famous and bizarre works of art.

One of the most disturbing was called Saturn devouring his son (1819-1823), which shows the Titan Cronus literally eating one of his descendants. Yeah, it got pretty dark sometimes.

Guillermo del Toro is a champion of the dark fantasy genre, with most of its strange creatures portrayed by Doug Jones. The pale man of Pan’s Labyrinth is particularly creepy, devoid of any elements except for oversized, saggy skin dripping from his bones.

At one point, the pale man bites off the head of a nearby fairy. Del Toro admitted that this scene was inspired by Goya, the Pale Man coming “straight from Goya’s painting of Saturn devouring his son.”

3. Nighthawks in Pennies From Heaven (1981)

It doesn’t seem like much is going on in nightjars (1942), but it remains one of the most recognizable oil paintings: four people in a late-night restaurant window.

Herbert Ross pays homage to the American art classic in his musical drama pennies from heaven, with Steve Martin. The film opens with Chicago in 1934, with so many scenes and settings based on post-war and Depression memories – photographs, paintings, books, etc.

The most obvious is certainly nightjars, with Steve Martin seated in a fedora hat next to Bernadette Peters. It’s not the only painting by Edward Hopper to appear on this list!

2. Paintings from Edward Hopper to Shirley: Visions of Reality (2013)

Shirley: visions of reality does not feature just one painting by Edward Hopper. It basically showcases its entire canon.

The modern artist was known for his poignant use of realism and block colouring, which experimental filmmaker/architect/artist Gustav Deutsch brought to life. His multiple disciplines allowed Deutsch to bring Hopper’s paintings to life in ways that Hollywood directors would never have imagined.

Shirley: visions of reality might feel like a bit of a cheat, as it’s a documentary (of sorts) and entirely based on paintings, not just one stage. However, we have yet to find a movie like this!

Deutsch uses this Shirley (Stephanie Cumming) to navigate Hopper’s world, cinematically invigorating thirteen paintings to tell the story of a woman who rejects reality and reconstructs her own.

1. Paintings by Van Gogh in Loving Vincent (2017)

Loving Vincent is another movie that has not just a re-enacted painting in scene, but the whole movie! However, unlike Shirley: visions of realityDorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman use a famous narrative structure and cast that we are more familiar with.

Loving Vincent is the only film of its kind: an experimental animated feature biopic of the legendary Vincent van Gogh, with the 65,000 images including individual oil paintings in the style of Van Gogh, created by a dedicated team of 125 artists.

Originally conceived as a short film, Loving Vincent received funding for the entire 95 minute run and won numerous awards.

Although they were (sophisticated) drawn, the actors are still recognizable, with Douglas Booth in the center, surrounded by Jerome Flynn, Saoirse Ronan, Helen McCrory and Chris O’Dowd.

Honorable Mentions

If you enjoyed those fun movies that reference real-life paintings, here are some additional honorable mentions to dive deeper into:

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Matthew Stone’s AI Paintings Reflect a Changing Art World https://cuimingda.com/matthew-stones-ai-paintings-reflect-a-changing-art-world/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 08:17:02 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/matthew-stones-ai-paintings-reflect-a-changing-art-world/ “Personally, I think every artist should just explore this technology, because it’s a paradigm shift,” says Matthew Stone of the proliferation of AI in an artistic context. Technology has long been integrated into his practice, used to create patchwork forms in his fantasy scenes, including the symbolically rich illustrations on FKA twigs’ second album, Magdalene. […]]]>

“Personally, I think every artist should just explore this technology, because it’s a paradigm shift,” says Matthew Stone of the proliferation of AI in an artistic context. Technology has long been integrated into his practice, used to create patchwork forms in his fantasy scenes, including the symbolically rich illustrations on FKA twigs’ second album, Magdalene.

In his latest body of work, the intersection of digital tools and manual techniques is further highlighted. Virtual Paintings, held at Unit London, is his first solo exhibition in the UK since 2016, and sees him debuting pieces that incorporate AI into his process for the first time.

Stone’s new workflow involved grabbing his past parts as image references in an early access build of Open AI’s Dall-E 2 (although he describes the system as “an enterprise version of a tool that should be free to use”, and recommends stable streaming instead). He then took the raw AI output and incorporated the generated images into larger pieces, created with his usual 3D modeling software, using them as brushstrokes and textures.

Top: The Red Studio, 2022; Above: The basement studio, 2022

As with his past works, these new compositions feature moving textures, spaces and figures. His signature digital brushstrokes get smudged, while the bodies and faces that inhabit the artfully chaotic studio environments are caught in mid-action halftime. The theatricality of the pieces pays homage to the creative circles in which he grew up as an artist, notably the time he spent living and working in squats within a collective.

“People coming together and creating social environments and playing, and there’s a deep, sweeping sense of acceptance of people manifesting exactly who they are, that’s very beautiful to me,” he explains. “There are a lot of references to historical painting and things like that, but I guess I always want to mix some of that grandeur with a contemporary, fun, upbeat sense of aesthetics.”

Virtual paintings by artist Matthew Stone
The Blue Workshop, 2022

Stone’s digital portraits line the studio spaces depicted in his pieces. It recalls the use of mise en abyme by personalities who buried their own pieces in larger scenes, such as Roy Lichtenstein with his Artist’s Studio series. Like Lichtenstein, Stone makes direct reference to Matisse in this new corpus, as well as to Nicolas Poussin’s masterpiece, Danse sur la musique du temps.

Above all, the transient energy of the works reflects the state of flux that pervades the world of visual arts and creativity, as technology rapidly transforms everything from modes of production to the attribution of value. Stone is acutely aware of both and believes that more artists should engage in the debates sparked by AI in the context of image-making.

“I think what’s really interesting about AI [is] there’s a kind of natural conversation around effort and what determines good art. And I think there’s this pervasive idea that things that take a long time, things that rely on a skill set that took a long time to develop, are inherently valuable,” he says. (Arguments of this nature aside, he was surprised to find that using AI still involved a long process.)

Virtual paintings by artist Matthew Stone
Dance (after Matisse), 2016-2022

He is interested in changes to “the way we think about creativity once the creation of high quality images is in everyone’s hands, so the democratization of image creation in a sense, the same way camera phones made everyone a photographer.” And I think we all know that there is still a lot of room for excellence in this field and interesting creative productions.

“I think when the creative industries are so competitive and often underpaid and underfunded, creatives are driven to want to keep the opportunities and their identities as unique and special individuals. I think that’s completely understandable because it’s a tough environment, but at the same time I really believe there’s an abundance of creativity and creative opportunities that can be in the same way, in referring to the iPhone, a democratization. I don’t think anything is threatened at this level, in terms of the potential for human creativity.

Virtual paintings by artist Matthew Stone
Good Vibes Only, 2022
Virtual paintings by artist Matthew Stone
The Hungry Painter, 2022
Virtual paintings by artist Matthew Stone
Makeup tutorial, 2022

Matthew Stone: Virtual Paintings is on display at Unit London until September 10; unitlondon.com

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Hues Folk Paintings Ukraine Sparkling Amid Chaos https://cuimingda.com/hues-folk-paintings-ukraine-sparkling-amid-chaos/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 09:21:12 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/hues-folk-paintings-ukraine-sparkling-amid-chaos/ When The Local History Museum of Ivankiv Ukraine The Fire was extinguished! Russian Continued Russia-Ukraine bombing A local resident risked his life earlier this year to save 25 museum works. The artworks were created by folk artists. Maria Prymachenko. This incident It is a good description of the influence that Prymachenko’s work had on the […]]]>

When The Local History Museum of Ivankiv Ukraine The Fire was extinguished! Russian Continued Russia-Ukraine bombing A local resident risked his life earlier this year to save 25 museum works. The artworks were created by folk artists. Maria Prymachenko. This incident It is a good description of the influence that Prymachenko’s work had on the life and culture of Ukrainian nationals. Bring 11 of his works are presented in CapitalAn. Digital reprints are possible The Ukrainian World This is Maria Prymachenko.

The Ukrainian folk art painter was a self-taught artist who worked in the style of naive art. His works included embroidery and ceramic painting, drawing inspiration from the folklore and mythology of the region. This made her an iconic figure. Ukrainian national identity Also on display will be 11 reproductions of Prymachenko’s paintings from the collection Here is the National Museum Here is Ukrainian folk decorative art Text Artist Dorota Pietrzyk.

Prymachenko’s works were inspired by local mythology and folklore, making her an icon of Ukrainian national identity.

“The project was initiated by the National Center of Culture of Poland in collaboration with the National Museum of Ukrainian Folk Decorative Arts to preserve destroyed art from the local history museum in Ivankiv, as well as to present abroad the works of world-renowned Ukrainian artist, “” Olena Ivanchuk, consul at the This It is Ukraine Embassy in New Delhi, adding: “The works have been selected in such a way as to give an idea of ​​the diversity of his art as well as only to show scenes of traditional Ukrainian life. The selected works, painted between the years 1963 and 1988, present an incredibly colorful world full of fantasy, filled with strange creatures, animals, floral motifs, as well as scenes from fairy tales.

These exquisite paintings depict mystical birds and animals as well as plants that interact with his works in a harmonious way. Ukrainian mythology. While Prymachenko’s works are full of folk ornamentation painted using rudimentary water-based paints, such as the so-called beginner’s tempera, towards the end of her life she switched to tempera paints. more expensive and of better quality. Share how his works were further developed. Ivanchuk explains: “Since the beginning of the 1960s, the size of Prymachenko’s works has increased. From translucent watercolor, the artist turned to thick saturated gouache, which in his works gives rise to sonorous and magical colors and images. At the end of the 1960s, a novelty essential to his creativity appeared: images supplemented by text captions and special explanations. They opened another aspect of the talent of the artist, poetic.

Inspired This avian imagery inspires the work Pigeon And Dove (1982) Maria Prymachenko.

While the country of the artist goes through the turmoil This Is war? Prymachenko’s bright, childlike depictions of scenes from daily life, such as farmers tending crops and plowing fields, convey a sense of hope and harmony. Ivanchuk says, “Preserving culture means preserving the soul of the nation. Prymachenko’s works are part of the cultural heritage of Ukraine, which presents Ukrainian mentality and traditions, creating a certain image of the Ukrainian nation. That is why it is so important for us to show Prymachenko’s paintings abroad. The exhibition was originally designed to create a sense of home for Ukrainian refugees, who had to flee Ukraine because of the war.

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The hues of Ukraine’s folk paintings sparkle amid the turmoil https://cuimingda.com/the-hues-of-ukraines-folk-paintings-sparkle-amid-the-turmoil/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 06:05:05 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/the-hues-of-ukraines-folk-paintings-sparkle-amid-the-turmoil/ When the Ivankiv local history museum in Ukraine caught fire under Russian bombardment amid the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian war earlier this year, a resident reportedly risked his life to save 25 works on display at the museum. The artworks on display were those of the late folk artist, Maria Prymachenko. This incident describes well the influence […]]]>

When the Ivankiv local history museum in Ukraine caught fire under Russian bombardment amid the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian war earlier this year, a resident reportedly risked his life to save 25 works on display at the museum. The artworks on display were those of the late folk artist, Maria Prymachenko. This incident describes well the influence that Prymachenko’s work has had on the life and culture of Ukrainian nationals. Bringing 11 of his works to the capital, through digital reprints, is an exhibition, The Ukrainian World of Maria Prymachenko.

The Ukrainian folk art painter was a self-taught artist who worked in the style of naive art. Her works, which also included embroidery and ceramic painting, were inspired by local mythology and folklore, making her an icon of Ukrainian national identity. The exhibition will include 11 reproductions of Prymachenko’s paintings from the collection of the National Museum of Ukrainian Folk Decorative Art with text by artist Dorota Pietrzyk.

Prymachenko’s works were inspired by local mythology and folklore, making her an icon of Ukrainian national identity.

“The project was initiated by the National Center of Culture of Poland in collaboration with the National Museum of Ukrainian Folk Decorative Arts to preserve destroyed art from the local history museum in Ivankiv, as well as to present abroad the works of the world-renowned Ukrainian artist,” says Olena Ivanchuk, Consul at the Ukrainian Embassy in New Delhi, adding: “The works have been selected in such a way as to give an idea of ​​the diversity of his art as well as ‘to show scenes of traditional Ukrainian life. The selected works, painted between the years 1963 and 1988, present an incredibly colorful world full of fantasy, filled with strange creatures, animals, floral motifs, as well as scenes of fairy tales.

The sublime creations on display represent birds, beasts and mystical plants, which interact in his paintings as harmoniously and easily as in nature in Ukrainian mythology. While Prymachenko’s works are full of folk ornamentation painted using rudimentary water-based paints, such as the so-called beginner’s tempera, towards the end of her life she switched to tempera paints. more expensive and of better quality. Sharing how his works have continued to evolve, Ivanchuk explains, “Since the early 1960s, the size of Prymachenko’s works has grown. From translucent watercolor, the artist turned to thick saturated gouache, which in his works gives rise to sonorous and magical colors and images. At the end of the 1960s, a novelty essential to his creativity appeared: images supplemented by text captions and special explanations. They opened another aspect of the artist’s talent – poetic.

This work Pigeon and Dove (1982) by Maria Prymachenko is inspired by avian imagery.

As the artist’s country weathers the turmoil of war, Prymachenko’s bright, childlike depictions of scenes of everyday life, such as farmers tending to crops and plowing fields, provide a sense of hope and of harmony. Ivanchuk says, “Preserving culture means preserving the soul of the nation. Prymachenko’s works are part of the cultural heritage of Ukraine, which presents Ukrainian mentality and traditions, creating a certain image of the Ukrainian nation. That is why it is so important for us to show Prymachenko’s paintings abroad. The exhibition was originally designed to create a sense of home for Ukrainian refugees, who had to flee Ukraine due to war.

Catch it live

What: The Ukrainian World of Maria Prymachenko

Where: India International Centre, Lodhi Road

Until: August 18

Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Nearest metro station: Jorbagh on the yellow line

Author tweets @later_gaytor
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Little-known artist behind iconic paintings on Nairobi buildings https://cuimingda.com/little-known-artist-behind-iconic-paintings-on-nairobi-buildings/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 16:39:27 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/little-known-artist-behind-iconic-paintings-on-nairobi-buildings/ Over the past few years, murals have become a common sight on the streets of Nairobi. In particular, the emblematic painting of the Extelecoms house dominated Haile Sellasie Avenue. However, despite the growing number of iconic paintings in the capital, little is known about the artist behind certain paintings. Unknown to many is the artist, […]]]>

Over the past few years, murals have become a common sight on the streets of Nairobi. In particular, the emblematic painting of the Extelecoms house dominated Haile Sellasie Avenue.

However, despite the growing number of iconic paintings in the capital, little is known about the artist behind certain paintings.

Unknown to many is the artist, Viktart Mwangi, who is credited with the artistry.

Mwangi is a 27-year-old Kenyatta University graduate with a passion for art. The KU graduate studied fine arts and design.

Murals on the side of the ExTelecoms building located along Avenue Haille Selassie

Case

His talent has been recognized around the world, with his expertise being harnessed in countries such as Australia, Rwanda and Tanzania.

Mwangi’s global recognition is attributed to his 2020 artwork from Maison Extelecoms, one of the greatest artworks in East Africa and Africa.

“His colorful murals are developed from a combination of reality and fantasy designed to stand out in the walls on which they are painted,” the Center of Contemporary Artists said on its website.

In addition to street art, the artist also produces murals in residences and schools. One of his famous school works is the transformation of the buildings of St Kizito School for the Deaf in collaboration with the Central Bank of Kenya (CBK).

His exceptional work within the institution was hailed by CBK boss Patrick Njoroge.

“Extelcoms House murals cover all four sides of the base of the building. Painted in vibrant colors, the murals tell the story of a nation and its dreams for the future.

“Then there is the superb work at St Kizito Litein School for the Deaf, Kericho. The walls give visual excitement and motivation to the students. What a transformation! Thank you for making a difference!” he stated.

Mwangi also has an illustrated book – “Shift + Ctr + VIKTRT” which features some of his works. He states that he derives his motivation for his creative work from the impact his work creates.

“I’ve learned that the effort is never wasted. That everything you pick up counts. I find myself thinking that everything I’ve learned so far has prepared me for this moment, every time I am facing an obstacle.

“I took a step back and looked at myself. I learned that I am happiest doing what I love. My work gives me purpose. It distracts me from reality. In the absence of something thing to do, I’m starting to crack,” he said.

A collage image of Viktart Mwangi working on a mural.

A collage image of Viktart Mwangi working on a street mural.

instagram

Viktar Mwangi

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Mie Yim’s Paintings in “Fluid Boundaries” Challenge the Eye and the Emotions | Art review | Seven days https://cuimingda.com/mie-yims-paintings-in-fluid-boundaries-challenge-the-eye-and-the-emotions-art-review-seven-days/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 14:00:35 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/mie-yims-paintings-in-fluid-boundaries-challenge-the-eye-and-the-emotions-art-review-seven-days/ Click to enlarge Courtesy “Gobble, Gobble” Mie Yim’s paintings are undeniably strange. Some observers would add “in a good way”. Others might not be so sure. Candy colors and fuzzy biomorphic shapes are playful and engaging, like […]]]>

Click to enlarge

  • Courtesy
  • “Gobble, Gobble”

Mie Yim’s paintings are undeniably strange. Some observers would add “in a good way”. Others might not be so sure. Candy colors and fuzzy biomorphic shapes are playful and engaging, like stuffed animals or cartoon characters. But their large, shiny black eyes, appearing singly rather than in pairs, scare you right away. When you look at a Yim painting, the painting is looking back.

The Brattleboro Museum & Art Center currently houses a dozen large-scale paintings and nine smaller “quarantine drawings” by the South Korean-born, New York-based artist. Yim has created most of these works in recent years, and his images could be said to reflect a period of pandemic dystopia. But, as her website reveals, Yim was on this trajectory long before COVID-19 sent us all to shelter.

“Yim is clearly comfortable with discomfort,” Sarah Freeman wrote in her curator statement. In effect. In this exhibition, titled “Fluid Boundaries,” the artist’s flux between abstraction and figuration—as well as between the realms of her fertile imagination—can leave the viewer “uncertain and off balance,” adds Freeman.

A few older paintings included in the exhibit indicate Yim’s earlier preoccupation with cuter – albeit subliminally dark – subjects. “Puppet Bunny”, from 2004, is a 41 x 52 inch pastel and acrylic composition on paper in a myopic blur. A fantasy, multicolored island hovers in a purple void. At one end of the island, a bluish-white stuffed dog with black ears rears up on its hind legs and holds the titular Charlie McCarthy-style rabbit. Both creatures stare at the viewer with tiny eyes. If a call for help could be adorable, this is it.

Click to enlarge
"Quarantine drawing 172" - COURTESY

  • Courtesy
  • “Quarantine Drawing 172”

“Janus”, a 20 x 16 inch oil on canvas from 2012, is a bridge to Yim’s unsettling hybrid of abstract figuration. Or is it figurative abstraction? Only the disproportionate doe’s eye and the kind of nose suggest a sentient being. And maybe those shiny eggplant-colored appendages at the bottom are legs. Or not. (All reality-based descriptors in this review are purely referential.)

“Tequila Hangover”, a 2013 oil on canvas, has a similar impact. Here, a gingerbread man-shaped creature has a large black eye and a sprinkling of shrub-like green “hair”. Two “ears” – one large, one stubby – rise like pink cacti from the top of the head. This creature’s body is slashed with yellow paint in an embossed pattern. The background is sky blue and diaphanous white.

This painting marks a transition to Yim’s more recent works in another way: size. All of the post-2018 canvases in the Brattleboro exhibit are approximately six feet tall. Needless to say, this scale is powerful.

Two years before the pandemic, Yim painted “Crocodile Tears”. It’s a whopping 77 by 45 inches, and the contents can be nasty if you see reused intestines and misplaced teeth in it. But you might just see pink, green, and yellow tubular shapes twisting and weaving in confusing, Escher-like ways. Yim’s soft focus gives this structure an ephemeral quality; strong horizontal bars seem to give it tensile strength.

Click to enlarge
"Rorschach" - COURTESY

Part of Yim’s artist statement might refer to this painting: “I use shapes, lines, and colors that coalesce into metaphysical portraits of pathos, anxiety, and pugnacious hilarity,” writes -she. “I layer soft edges like cotton balls against horizontal and vertical lines acting like scaffolding or skeletons.”

In this oil painting and others, Yim confidently pushes his compositions to the edge of the picture plane. This gives them a sense of challenge, as if normal two-dimensional rulers are weak constraints. This suggestive viewer imagined Yim’s creations bursting after gallery hours; that’s the kind of fantasy his mutant images evoke.

“Rorschach”, painted this year, is by far the most alarming work and is a stylish departure from Yim’s hazier, more colorful forms. The 70 x 60 inch canvas depicts a celestial being defined by dabs of paint that look like electrical fumes in the night sky. Except for the eyes – four of them. Here Yim opts for a couple logically located in the head of the being and another in a second illusory face at the level of the torso. They are human or animal eyes, with whites, which seem to follow the viewer in a disturbing way.

Click to enlarge
"Napalm" - COURTESY

“Napalm” (2021) looks dark, but the 72-by-60-inch painting is more beautiful than silly. Yim uses energetic dots and streaks of paint to represent the fireworks. Below them, obsessive patterns emerge from a deep magenta field, and there could be a big eye popping out of chrysanthemum explosions. Or is it a menacing black hole? If this painting envisions the end of the world as we know it, at least it’s pretty.

The “quarantine drawings,” in pastel on 11-inch by 8.5-inch handmade Shizen paper, are mostly dense, abstract exercises with surreal colors and “plant structures,” as Yim calls them.

She revisits the dialectic of creepy and cute in several large paintings, such as “Gooble Gobble” (2021). This subject has a big eye, big teeth, and a wraparound thing that looks like a zucchini gone rogue. Still, it’s a stretch to call this six-foot oil figurative. In “Fluid Boundaries”, the categories are inadequate; Yim’s visual vocabulary is fiercely original.

“I agree to paint intuitively,” she writes. “Painting this way is like falling backwards without a net.”

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