Abstract paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 12:17:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cuimingda.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-25T191724.119-150x150.png Abstract paintings – Cui Mingda http://cuimingda.com/ 32 32 Large textile works and abstract paintings by Ptolemy Mann are exhibited at the Findlay, Palm… https://cuimingda.com/large-textile-works-and-abstract-paintings-by-ptolemy-mann-are-exhibited-at-the-findlay-palm/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 20:08:03 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/large-textile-works-and-abstract-paintings-by-ptolemy-mann-are-exhibited-at-the-findlay-palm/ Findlay Galleries is pleased to announce its exclusive representation of British abstract artist Ptomley Mann in the United States and to celebrate its recent partnership with an exhibition of the artist’s works on display at Findlay Galleries, Palm Beach. Mann graduated from her formal art studies at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of […]]]>

Findlay Galleries is pleased to announce its exclusive representation of British abstract artist Ptomley Mann in the United States and to celebrate its recent partnership with an exhibition of the artist’s works on display at Findlay Galleries, Palm Beach.

Mann graduated from her formal art studies at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of Art. Since 1992, she has been creating architectural and chromatic wall art for private, public and corporate clients using her technique of dyeing and hand weaving. She also creates large-format acrylic and gouache paintings on Arches paper and canvas; Mann states, “In complete contrast to the exquisite slowness of the woven artworks, these paintings are spontaneous and emotional punches of color.”

His time-consuming and unique approach to creating these works has evolved over the past twenty years. The exquisite dynamics of colors move across their fine surface, creating a painterly sweep. The term ‘chromatic minimalism’ has been applied to her work and she is heavily influenced by abstract expressionism and architecture. Mann expresses a deep sense of craftsmanship and precision through an abstract narrative.

Visit Findlay Galleries, Palm Beach, to see the unique and breathtaking work of Ptomely Mann, which exhibits complementary synergy, marrying the beauties of textural and tonal variance from muted gradients to fluorescent color fields.

About Findlay Galleries

Founded: 1870 Findlay Galleries celebrate 152 years in the art business. A family business founded in 1870 representing over 100 artists and artist estates, with galleries in Palm Beach and New York. Specializing in Impressionism, European Modernism, the School of Rouen, the School of Paris and 20th century American art, with exclusive representation of contemporary artists and artists’ estates.

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The stories they tell – abstract paintings at SJIMA https://cuimingda.com/the-stories-they-tell-abstract-paintings-at-sjima/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/the-stories-they-tell-abstract-paintings-at-sjima/ Submitted by the San Juan Islands Museum of Art. When we think of abstract art, we tend to think of the unfettered and often chaotic paintings of iconic painters such as Jackson Pollack or Wassily Kandinsky. Since the arrival of abstract art in the early 20th century, this genre has captured the imagination and respect […]]]>

Submitted by the San Juan Islands Museum of Art.

When we think of abstract art, we tend to think of the unfettered and often chaotic paintings of iconic painters such as Jackson Pollack or Wassily Kandinsky. Since the arrival of abstract art in the early 20th century, this genre has captured the imagination and respect of artists and art lovers. Although this form is generally considered a vividly colored and unruly expression of the individual artist, it often represents more than colors, lines and shapes. This art almost always tells a story and inspires the involvement and imagination of those who look at it. The term Abstract Art is defined as art that does not attempt to represent an accurate representation of a visual reality, but rather uses shapes, colors, forms, and gestural marks to achieve its effect.

The current Artists Registry exhibit at the San Juan Islands Museum of Art features several abstract paintings that invite the viewer to step back, look longer, and explore the artist’s shared history.

Winnie Brumsickle, an artist from San Juan Island, exhibits her painting titled, We Can Breathe, a large acrylic painting, on natural linen. Her work juxtaposes shapes and colors in an attractive way, using shapes and lines as the artist’s expression unfolds. Brumsickle says: “Scent and abstraction are my bridges to others, with which I aim to induce a sense of freedom from time, from anxiety, from ambition – and from the ever-changing landscape of our ideas about humanity.

Waldron Island artist Pamela Mills followed the impulse of recycling an old landscape painting by covering it with a large portion in white, an experience that greatly influenced the painting she chose to exhibit, generation (3). Of his process, Mills says, “I start by brushing bands and paths of white into older or incomplete landscape work. This process of improvisation gradually reveals abstract shapes and symbols that stand out against the white background, while the old painting undergoes a dramatic metamorphosis. Generation (3) refers to the beginnings. Viewers will bring their own stories and ideas to the work, as a small inanimate painted tableau comes to life.

Many islanders know Gretchen Allison as the longtime chef and owner of Duck Soup Inn, San Juan Island’s iconic and popular restaurant. After selling the restaurant, in addition to teaching cooking classes, Gretchen embarked on what became a successful artistic career. His painting, Goodbye Kiss, which is part of the current Artists’ Registry exhibition, is a departure from his previous figurative paintings and is a stunning example of abstract art. Acrylic paint on linen canvas, her creation resonates with energy and evokes feelings of adventure and movement. Allison says, “As this work took shape, I saw shapes like planets, faces and animals appear and then change with the next coat of paint. The rust color of the paint resembled age and decay, the change from one substance to another and the processes of destruction and recomposition. So the title, Goodbye Kiss, reminds me to love what’s in the moment, to mourn for what’s lost, and to look forward to what’s next.

The artists exhibiting abstract paintings in the exhibition are Laura Bauer, Yvonne Buijs-Mancuso, Pamela Coffey, Melinda Dryer, Alison Engle, Alayne Goodheart, Lisa Lamoreaux, Marsha McAllister, Joe Miller, Dana Roberts and Rudi Ann Weissinger.

Whichever way you encounter abstract paintings, you’re sure to appreciate the many examples of this dynamic art form at the SJIMA Artist Registry Exhibition, on display until February 21, 2022.

Located in Friday Harbor at 540 Spring Street, admission to the museum is $10. SJIMA members and those 18 and under are admitted free. Museum hours are Friday through Monday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays are Pay as You Can Days. For more information, visit www.sjima.org.

The Artist Registry Show is brought to us by the Honeywell Charitable Fund, National Endowment for the Arts, Washington State Arts Commission, San Juan Island Community Foundation, City of Friday Harbor, Anonymous, Printonyx, Browne’s Home Center and Harbor Rentals.

Photo added “Goodbye Kiss” by Gretchen Allison.

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How to Start Pouring Acrylic and Creating Abstract Paintings https://cuimingda.com/how-to-start-pouring-acrylic-and-creating-abstract-paintings/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/how-to-start-pouring-acrylic-and-creating-abstract-paintings/ Photo: Image bank by Jennylynn Fields/ShutterstockThis article may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more information. that you want to call it fluid art, liquid art or acrylic pouring, there’s nothing more satisfying than creating abstract masterpieces by letting the […]]]>

Photo: Image bank by Jennylynn Fields/Shutterstock
This article may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more information.

that you want to call it fluid art, liquid art or acrylic pouring, there’s nothing more satisfying than creating abstract masterpieces by letting the pigments run wild. This form of abstract art uses acrylics with a liquid consistency to create psychedelic paintings. There are endless creative possibilities with the different ways to combine acrylic paints and there’s something so satisfying about seeing it spread across a surface.

start with acrylic casting isn’t particularly difficult, making it a great art form for all skill levels. With so many techniques to try, you can get as simple or complicated as you want. At its core, fluid art lets you learn a lot about materials and is great for experimenting with color and technique. It’s also fun for all ages!

Acrylic Casting Supplies

Acrylic Casting Supplies

DecoArt | $2.71+

Best Paint for Acrylic Casting

The key to a good acrylic pour is the consistency… of the paint. You will want to use fluid acrylics, which have a much thinner consistency than thick bodied acrylics. If you only have thicker acrylics on hand, you can still use them, but you will need to thin them with water.

Some people have great success just using craft paints (apple barrel and American are two popular brands), but if you want a piece of art that lasts a long time, we suggest using professional quality fluid acrylics. Golden Fluid Acrylic and Liquitex Soft Body Acrylics are excellent choices for their powerful pigments and lightfastness.

Casting mediums

Although fluid acrylics have a high viscosity, you will still want to add something to create the consistency you are looking for. What you will add depends on whether you are doing a cast coated, where the finished product has bright, even layers of color, or a wash pour, where the finished product almost looks like layers of watercolor.

To achieve the desired viscosity and casting rate, you can adjust with water first. Fluid acrylics won’t need much, if any, to add; and for coated casting, only a small amount in a ratio of 1:10 should be added. Adding more water will also change the paint’s adhesion to your surface, so try not to exceed a 1:1 ratio, which is recommended for washouts. By experimenting and tweaking things, you’ll discover all types of fun effects.

Acrylic Pouring Medium

Liquitex | $31.89

Beyond the water, a good casting medium This is the key. Liquitex Professional Pouring Medium is a popular choice for its ability to create even sheets and puddles while promoting drying. AGC 800 is another quality casting medium because it helps prevent cracks from appearing. Known as crazing, the cracks appear due to uneven drying times between the lower and upper tiers. One of the downsides of GAC 800 is that it can become slightly hazy when dry, so it’s not ideal for use as a clear topcoat. If you are looking to get started without investing too much, Floetrol is another effective casting medium without breaking the bank.

Isopropyl alcohol can also be added to pours to create interesting circular cells, which occur when the quick-drying alcohol tries to escape. A ratio of 2 parts casting fluid to one part acrylic to one part isopropyl alcohol will give excellent results.

There are also a number of people who use glue, silicon, and oils ranging from motor oil to coconut oil to create cells or serve as casting fluids. All of them can give interesting results but can decrease the longevity of your paint because they can modify the properties of the paint.

Acrylic casting

Photo: Image bank by Jennylynn Fields/Shutterstock

Supplies to start pouring paint

Many people are starting to use canvas for their fluid art. For best results, try prepping your canvas with a coat of gesso to better support the weight of the paint. As the canvas can deform a little under too much weight, which makes the surface uneven, prepared artist panels are often the safest choice.

Clear topcoat

DecoArt | $10.88+

Another essential part of liquid art is keeping your space clean! Obviously, it’s an art form that can get messy, so plastic sheets to prevent your table or floor from becoming stained is essential. Other must-sees include clear plastic cups, squeeze bottles, and wooden stirrers. Palette knives will help you smudge and even paint towards the edges and a torch can eliminate bubbles and bring out cells in specific areas. You will also want a beautiful clear topcoat to seal your work once it’s done.

Acrylic Casting Techniques

Experimentation is key, but two basic techniques for pouring paint will help you create your own psychedelic masterpiece:pay directly and dirty pour. We’ll dive deeper into what each of these methods entails, but wWhichever technique you choose, you need to make sure you are working on a flat surface to ensure you get the best possible results, both when pouring and when letting the paint dry.

Pour directly

Dirt Pour Art

Photo: Priscilia Salinas via Shutterstock

A pay directly is simply when you individually add color to your surface, building layers as you go. One method is to pour “puddles” of individual colors which are then manipulated to move across the surface as the canvas is tilted at different angles. Straight pours can provide nice crisp lines of color when wrapping pour or feathering effects when creating a wash pour. You can also drag them with all types of instruments to create different effects.

pour dirty

Acrylic casting

Photo: Jennylynn Fields via Shutterstock

With the dirty pour technique, all your paints are placed in a cup before being poured onto the panel or canvas. Consistency is key here – if the paints are too runny they will mix in the cup and come out muddy. This technique will not work well for washes, where the colors are quite thin. Dirty pours are great because they are so instinctive and you never know what will come out of the cup. Once you understand the densities you can create with different colors, you’ll see that anything is possible.

To be even more spontaneous, try a flip the cup or one funnel for. With a flap cup, you’ll want to place your canvas on top of your container once it’s filled with color. Turn everything upside down, then slowly lift the cup, allowing the colors to spread across the surface. To make a funnel, block the pouring end of the funnel while you fill it with paint. Once you are ready, place the funnel on your canvas or panel and allow the paint to flow from the funnel as you move it.

To glide

To make acrylic scanning technique, you can apply your choice of paint or paints and silicone directly to the canvas. Then you glide over the canvas with a tool, which can be a damp cloth, a piece of plastic wrap, painting knives or spatulas. This will create a striking cellular formation on the canvas, in which the different colors naturally separate into cellular shapes. This technique can also be used in conjunction with other acrylic casting techniques.

Dutch casting

In the Dutch technique (also called air swipe technique), you will apply the colors of your choice directly on the canvas. Then you will use a hair dryer or other device to blow the paint onto the canvas. It will help you create fascinating patterns and effects in a relatively short time.

Looking to get more advanced learning?

acrylic casting book

Rick Cheadle | $35

by Rick Cheadle Fluid Art Recipes and Art Journal is packed with over 100 casting recipes to take your craft even further and YouTube is packed with tutorials from knowledgeable experts like Nicky James Burch of Fluid Art Studios and Gina DeLuca.

Get inspired to try acrylic pouring by watching these fascinating videos of artists in action.

This article has been edited and updated.

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Louise Fishman’s drawings, an intimate lens for her abstract paintings – ARTnews.com https://cuimingda.com/louise-fishmans-drawings-an-intimate-lens-for-her-abstract-paintings-artnews-com/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/louise-fishmans-drawings-an-intimate-lens-for-her-abstract-paintings-artnews-com/ “It is not easy to write about abstract painting,” the late artist Louise Fishman once said, expressing both a general truth and a personal concern. Perhaps finding paper—a medium for verbal and visual articulation—to be most helpful in helping him negotiate this dilemma, Fishman annotated many of his works on paper with all-caps script, an […]]]>

“It is not easy to write about abstract painting,” the late artist Louise Fishman once said, expressing both a general truth and a personal concern. Perhaps finding paper—a medium for verbal and visual articulation—to be most helpful in helping him negotiate this dilemma, Fishman annotated many of his works on paper with all-caps script, an ever-growing set of diaristic fragments and ideas that run through this sensitive and immersive investigation of his drawings. “It’s working-class Jewish lesbian art. In case you didn’t already know,” one pencil sketch coyly asserts from 1973. The image depicts an idiosyncratic pie chart in which a circle is divided into segments of varying shades accompanied by scoring internal speech. Fishman’s internal dialogue is alternately scolding (“not hard enough”) and vulnerable (“What I often forget is that headaches have afraid – these 3 drawings are afraid”), which makes the otherwise modest piece feel like a meaningful summary of her perpetually interrogative practice, which has thus far been defined by her large-scale paintings.

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Spanning the course of Fishman’s career, from his years in the MFA program at the University of Illinois in the early 1960s through 2018, the more than one hundred works on display at the Krannert Art Museum come almost entirely from Fishman’s personal collection and most have never been exhibited before. Avoiding a linear and developmental structure, the exhibition, curated by the museum’s curator of modern and contemporary art, Amy L. Powell, in close collaboration with the artist who died just a month before its opening, is instead organized according to The Grammar formal version of Fishman, with sections titled “Transfers”, “Grids”, “Curves”, “Flat Folds” and “Expressions”. Inside each, graphic and pictorial gestures, chronologies and materials collapse and intertwine. In “Grids,” for example, a thick, blocky oil-on-paper drawing from 1975 appears alongside a vaguely scribbled oil-and-stick painting from 2001; in “Curves,” a grid of broad cross-hatches from 2001 hangs alongside a series of sketchy ink-on-paper horse silhouettes from 1995. Walking through the galleries, one becomes attentive to Fishman’s creative strategies but also detached of their specificity – see, on the contrary, how they have fueled a continuous process of invention and revision, disclosure and occlusion.

A graphite drawing of a pie chart includes handwritten annotations from an artist reflecting on himself and his work.

Louise Poissonman, Untitled (This is working class Jewish lesbian art. In case you didn’t already know)1973, graphite on paper, 24 by 18 inches.
Courtesy of the artist/© Louise Fishman

The exhibition’s most cohesive form is the accordion-style leporello book, nearly a dozen of which are scattered throughout the exhibition, their interiors unfolded to reveal intricate paintings that embrace the rhythm of sequential images or cross the pages to create a continuous whole. Fishman turned to leporello in 1992, after a fire destroyed her studio, along with all of her art and possessions. It was a crippling trauma that she slowly reconstructed from filling the small pages of these little books, whose origins can be traced to Don Giovanni’s long scroll of romantic conquests, as well as a Buddhist tradition in which pilgrims recount their visits to sites. . on the Buddha’s journey to enlightenment. Channeling both lines, Fishman’s books often specifically address lovers past or present and serve as meditative records for his varied formal approaches. They also act as collapsible works that combine literary and artistic associations, begging to be both read and seen. abuse book (1993-1994), a particularly powerful example, is dedicated to her former lover Bertha Harris. Its pages shift from torn, scooped, and crudely layered black-and-white painted collages to darkly hued color fields with a bright central notch; halfway through the book, the gash slowly becomes the focal point of the composition and transitions from a watery brown mark to a crisp column that eventually bursts into a vibrant, colorful grid. Such transformations give the sense of a narrative arc, from a tangled tumult to an erotic climax that resolves into ecstatic clarity. Although less explicit, this narrative impulse, once identified, is found throughout the show, whether in Fishman’s intermittent self-reflections, the trajectory of his gestural experimentations or his more serial imagery. Another book, from 2013, is listed: For the beloved, my love, Ingrid on your birthday on April 9, 2013, your loving and passionate and always trembling wife, Louise– a love story written in drips, smudges and puddles of sensuously saturated green, yellow and blue paint interspersed with Ingrid’s clippings of hair.

In a 2016 interview, Fishman explained, “It’s always been a problem for my career that I’m one, queer, two, one woman and three, doing old abstract paintings. It doesn’t have the subject matter you see in other lesbian work – subject matter that makes things more accessible and easy to write about. This tension – between readability and illegibility, abstraction and representation – is at the center of this exhibition. And leporello’s books—private artifacts, here made public, that can be expanded into near-epic compendiums of a lifetime’s emotive tokens or whittled down to pocket archives of affection and art—feel like his intimate guidebook.

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Abstract paintings look like colorful pressed flowers https://cuimingda.com/abstract-paintings-look-like-colorful-pressed-flowers/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/abstract-paintings-look-like-colorful-pressed-flowers/ Former fashion designer and visual artist Yuta Okuda creates compelling abstract paintings that showcase the beauty of the “little things” we take for granted. He uses a floral motif, a symbol of good childhood memories, to build colorful bouquets that pop out of the canvas. These flower arrangements are made up of thick dollops of […]]]>

Former fashion designer and visual artist Yuta Okuda creates compelling abstract paintings that showcase the beauty of the “little things” we take for granted. He uses a floral motif, a symbol of good childhood memories, to build colorful bouquets that pop out of the canvas.

These flower arrangements are made up of thick dollops of acrylic paint and lots of intricate lines. In each piece, black stems extend from the bottom of the painting to support the vibrant flowers. “Flowers expressed in different colors have a strong pop image, but each individual petal is delicately drawn,” he says of the artist. website. “Okuda says it doesn’t have to look like a flower, and flowers certainly don’t seem to have concrete realism.”

The artist has been a full-time painter since 2016, but it’s only very recently that floral design has become a major part of his work. “In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, [Okuda] realized that the things he had taken for granted were extraordinary events all along, and from there he started drawing flower artworks with the theme of “with gratitude”. His first solo exhibition in America, which took place in early November in New York City – was entitled With gratitude in honor of the inspiration behind the series.

You can follow Okuda on instagram to see more art and keep up to date with upcoming exhibitions.

Japanese artist Yuta Okuda creates mesmerizing abstract paintings that look like colorful pressed flowers.

Abstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaAbstract Flower Paintings by Yuta OkudaYuta Okuda: Website | instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos of Yuta Okuda.

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10 Famous Abstract Paintings Every Art Lover Should Know https://cuimingda.com/10-famous-abstract-paintings-every-art-lover-should-know/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/10-famous-abstract-paintings-every-art-lover-should-know/ After centuries of tradition, abstract artists sought to make paintings that did not follow conventional “rules” like naturalism and perspective. This radical style gave rise to powerfully lyrical paintings that emphasized color, composition, and emotion. The Dutch painter Piet Mondrian, for example, created Composition with red, blue and yellow, which eloquently sums up his aesthetic […]]]>

After centuries of tradition, abstract artists sought to make paintings that did not follow conventional “rules” like naturalism and perspective. This radical style gave rise to powerfully lyrical paintings that emphasized color, composition, and emotion.

The Dutch painter Piet Mondrian, for example, created Composition with red, blue and yellow, which eloquently sums up his aesthetic philosophy using straight lines and primary colors. Likewise, Kazimir Malevich black square is an oft-quoted abstract piece due to the purity of its simplicity. Other pioneers like Hilma af Klint and Wassily Kandinsky created canvases that also left their mark by proving that there are endless ways to capture human experiences in the abstract.

Here we will explore 10 Famous Abstract Paintings and find out what made them so important.

Broaden your knowledge of art history by learning about these 10 famous abstract paintings.

Hilma de Klint, No. 7, adulthood, 1907

No. 7 Painting of Adulthood by Hilma Af Klint

Hilma af Klint, “No.7, Adulthood”, 1907 (Photo: Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

Although not as well known as many male artists of her time, Swedish artist Hilma af Klint was a pioneering abstract artist whose radical paintings predate many of her male contemporaries. She requested that her vast body of work – most of which was never exhibited during her lifetime – remain unseen for up to 20 years after her death. No. 7, adulthood part of Af Klint The ten greatest series. The collection represents the stages of life, including childhood, youth, maturity and old age. They combine botanical elements and recognizable organic objects that refer to birth and growth. This huge canvas, measuring 3 meters high and 2 meters wide, was painted on paper, on the floor of the studio, then glued on a canvas.

Af Klint interprets adulthood in full bloom by painting various flowing shapes of different sizes and colors on a lilac background. The central yellow symbol resembles a flower, while the spirals and biomorphic shapes are symbols of growth and fertility.

Wassily Kandinsky, Composition VII, 1913

Composition VII Painting by Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky, “Composition VII”, 1913 (Photo: Tretyakov Gallery Going through Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

Russian art theorist and painter Wassily Kandinsky used color and abstract shapes to communicate different human experiences. Many of his pieces are inspired by music and he believed sounds could be found in his brushstrokes.

Composition VII was made when the artist was living in Munich, Germany. Although the composition may seem chaotic at first glance, Kandinsky spent months designing it, creating more than 30 oil and watercolor sketches before completing the final piece. The theme of this painting is battle and redemption. Some of the symbols including boars, mountains and figures can be spotted in the maze of colors and symbols.

Kazimir Malevich, black square, 1915

Malevich's black square painting

Kazimir Malevich, “Black Square”, 1915 (Photo: Tretyakov Gallery Going through Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

Russian artist Kazimir Malevich honed his painting skills in many styles, but ultimately became known for his Suprematist abstract art, which relied on geometric shapes. black square is his most iconic painting, which he reproduced four times with slightly different variations.

The 1915 version is the first of these works and is considered by art historians and critics to be a seminal work of modern art, and often referred to as “painting’s ground zero”. Malevich himself said of the work: “[Black Square is meant to evoke] the experience of pure-objectivity in the empty white of a liberated nothing.

Paul Klee, The Twitter Machine, 1922

Twittering Machine Painting by Paul Klee

Kurt Schwitters, “Das Undbild”, 1919 (Photo: MoMA Going through Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

Swiss-born German artist Paul Klee had much in common with his contemporary Wassily Kandinsky. Both artists were members of the German Expressionist group Der Blaue Reiter, and both were deeply influenced by the connection between music and painting. The Twitter Machine is Klee’s most famous sound representation. It depicts a flock of birds on a wire with a crank mechanism. Klee made this illustration in a mixed technique with watercolour, ink and oil.

Piet Mondrian, Composition with red, blue and yellow, 1930

Composition with red, blue and yellow by Piet Mondrian

Piet Mondrian, “Composition with red, blue and yellow”, 1930 (Photo: Kunsthaus Zurich via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain)

After painting in a realistic style for years, Dutch artist Piet Mondrian joined the abstract art movement and quickly became a revolutionary figure. He formed his own philosophy on an abstraction called neoplasticism (also called From Stijl), describing it as follows: “This new plastic idea will ignore the peculiarities of appearance…on the contrary, it should find expression in the abstraction of form and color, that is, in the line straight and well defined. primary color.” Composition with red, blue and yellow is a well-known example of these ideas.

Wassily Kandinsky, Composition X, 1939

Composition X Painting by Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky, “Composition X”, 1939 (Photo: Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen Going through Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

The last in his series of Compositions, Composition X is the pinnacle of Kandinsky’s exploration of expression through unrepresentative form. The organic forms were influenced by the biomorphic figures of surrealism while the colors express the inner emotions Kandinsky felt towards the end of his life. The black background represents the cosmos and the end of life while letting the colored parts stand out. The painting illustrates the circle of life and the emotional ups and downs that everyone experiences in the world.

Paul Clee, death and fire, 1940

Death and Fire Painting by Paul Klee

Paul Klee, “Death and Fire”, 1940 (Photo: Paul Klee Center Going through Wikimedia Commons, Public domain)

Klee painted death and fire in 1940, just months before his death in June of that year. He suffered from a condition known as scleroderma, which caused him painful joints and rashes on his hands. This explains why his work during this period became increasingly simplistic, and death and fire is a key example.

Klee was influenced by primitive art in the past, but this painting is particularly simplistic and critics have even equated it with the style of cave paintings. Illustration of mortality, the oil on jute piece features a central design in the shape of a human skull with the word ‘tod’ (the German word for ‘death’). “Tod” is found in the “T” shape of the character’s raised arm, the golden orb (O) in his hand, and the D-shape of his face.

Mark Rothko, Yellow, pink and lavender on pink, 1950

#03 Mark Rothko - White center (yellow, pink and lavender on pink), 1950, $72,840,000 (20070515, N08317, Lot 31)

The name of Mark Rothko immediately evokes canvases of large flat areas of color. The Russian-American abstract artist specializing in color field painting, which describes art that uses large flat areas of color. Rothko experimented with a range of color combinations to communicate different human experiences and emotions. Yellow, pink, lavender on pink is one of his earliest pieces from the 1950s. The warm juxtaposition of colors evokes a sense of joy.

Barnett Newman, Vir Heroicus Sublimis, 1951

Vir Heroicus Sublimis

Another pioneer of color fields, the American artist Barnett Newman, believed: “A painter is a choreographer of space. He invented what he called the “zip”, which is a vertical band of color that distinguishes his work from his fellow Abstract Expressionists.

His painting Vir heroicus sublimis (“Man, Heroic and Sublime”), measures an epic 95 by 213 inches and was his largest painting at the time. It features large fields of bright red that are interrupted by occasional “zipline” vertical lines. With his overwhelming scale, Newman attempted to evoke a strong reaction from the viewer and completely envelop them – and their personal space – in the vibrant hue.

Helene Frankenthaler, Mountains and sea, 1952

Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea

American artist Helen Frankenthaler has developed her own revolutionary technique for filling canvases with large fields of color. She invented the “dip-stain” process, which involved pouring paint thinned with turpentine onto the canvas. This technique produced vibrant, hazy compositions that gave an entirely new look and feel to the texture of the canvas. Mountains and Sea (1952) was the first artwork in which Frankenthaler used this process, and when fellow color field artists Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland saw the work, they quickly adopted the method as well.

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5 Famous Beach Paintings From Art History That Capture Serene Summer Days

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Princeton Arts Council presents ‘Talk to Me’ abstract paintings by Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker https://cuimingda.com/princeton-arts-council-presents-talk-to-me-abstract-paintings-by-janet-filomeno-and-katherine-parker/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/princeton-arts-council-presents-talk-to-me-abstract-paintings-by-janet-filomeno-and-katherine-parker/ NEWS | CHARACTERISTICS | PREVIEWS | EVENTS originally published: 08/10/2021 (PRINCETON, NJ) — The Princeton Arts Council will exhibit Talk to me, a collection of abstract paintings by longtime friends and collaborators Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker. The exhibition will be presented from October 16 to November 20, 2021. The public is invited to an […]]]>
NEWS | CHARACTERISTICS | PREVIEWS | EVENTS



originally published: 08/10/2021

(PRINCETON, NJ) — The Princeton Arts Council will exhibit Talk to me, a collection of abstract paintings by longtime friends and collaborators Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker. The exhibition will be presented from October 16 to November 20, 2021. The public is invited to an opening reception on Saturday, October 16 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker met in Hoboken in 1991. They felt an immediate affinity as both were painters of great expressionist works. Each grappled with the challenges of finding a new language to reinvent and personalize the ideas of abstract painting for their generation. A conversation began between the two friends that continued for over 25 years and the two continued to paint and show extensively in the NY/NJ area. The successive studio visits over the years have been an important touchstone for everyone, a way to experiment and share new work, to take up challenges. A voice of trust is paramount during this process.

“When artists are friends, they spend years, even decades, watching each other’s work change and grow,” Filomeno and Parker share. “They talk together in studios, galleries, museums and cafes, discussing the intersection of life and art. These conversations are so important to artists because studio practice is quiet and sometimes lonely. The shorthand developed over years of conversation can ignite a body of work, deepen a theme, or reinvent an idea that is just beginning to take shape. It is not surprising that such friendships have historically been so important for the development of new ideas and schools of thought.

The Princeton Arts Council presents "talk to me"  Abstract paintings by Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker

Catherine Parkerit is new works address themes of memory, time and loss. Large painterly pieces are slowly crafted by adding layer upon layer of thin oil paint, the shapes and marks appearing and receding as the finished painting emerges. Parker has exhibited her work at MOMA/PS1, Newark Museum, Jersey City Museum, Spanierman Modern, Heidi Cho Gallery, Accola Littlejohn Gallery and many other venues in NY and NJ. She is the recipient of a Yaddo Fellowship, an Edward Albee Fellowship, and a fellowship from the NJ State Council for the Arts. She has lectured at many museums and universities in the region about her work.

The Princeton Arts Council presents "talk to me"  Abstract paintings by Janet Filomeno and Katherine Parker

Janet Filomeno is best known for her large-scale gestural abstract paintings that use a variety of materials such as ink, mica, shellac, acrylic paint, graphite, charcoal, paint markers, and sometimes collage. Using her physical action like pouring, throwing and throwing colored liquids onto the stretched canvas on the ground, she is able to recreate the movement that can be felt in oceans, rivers and other bodies of water. It’s an intuitive process she follows as she uses the physicality of her body to move/move the canvas in different directions to create a heightened sense of movement as each layer is poured. As various shapes and liquids collide across the canvas, one can feel the reference to water and all of its associations in both physical and metaphorical ways. Bodies of water are an ongoing theme that runs through his many different series. Filomeno searches for visual metaphors and metaphysical connections to form a collective experience of inside and outside.

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Filomeno exhibited nationally and internationally. She has been included in numerous museum exhibits, including the City of Trenton Museum, James A. Michener Museum, Morris Museum, Montclair Museum, and the Hunterdon and Paterson Museums. Internationally, she has exhibited in Japan, China, Korea, Austria and Italy.

In New York, she has exhibited in various galleries, including the JCacciola and the Walter Wickiser Gallery. In addition to her exhibit history, she has taught and lectured at various museums and universities in the tri-state area. She was Adjunct Professor of Art at Montclair State University (age 18) and William Paterson University.

Born in New York, NY, Janet Filomeno lives and works in New Hope, PA. Currently his work is represented by the Walter Wickiser Gallery in New York and Posner Fine Art in Los Angeles, CA. His work is included in various museums, private and public collections.

This exhibition is an opportunity to show new works side by side: paintings rich in history and shared experience, reflecting a dialogue of faith, friendship and the possibilities of abstract painting. Talk to me is a show about the long friendships and conversations between two artists.

Gallery hours: Monday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free and open to the public. The Princeton Arts Council is located at 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton, New Jersey.

The Princeton Arts Council, a non-profit organization founded in 1967, fulfills its mission of building community through the arts by presenting a wide range of programs including public art projects, exhibitions, performances, free community cultural events and studio classes and workshops. Princeton Arts Council programs are designed to be high quality, engaging, affordable, and accessible to the diverse population of the greater Princeton area.

TOP PHOTO: Works by Janet Filomeno (left) and Katherine Parker (right) side by side

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David Zwirner presents abstract paintings by Jesse Murry, part of a series of exhibitions dedicated to artists who died during the HIV/AIDS crisis https://cuimingda.com/david-zwirner-presents-abstract-paintings-by-jesse-murry-part-of-a-series-of-exhibitions-dedicated-to-artists-who-died-during-the-hiv-aids-crisis/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/david-zwirner-presents-abstract-paintings-by-jesse-murry-part-of-a-series-of-exhibitions-dedicated-to-artists-who-died-during-the-hiv-aids-crisis/ Installation view of “Jesse Murry” at David Zwirner, New York MARKING THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publish its first report on what would become AIDS, David Zwirner presents more life, a special series devoted to artists who died of HIV/AIDS-related illnesses during the first two decades of the epidemic. […]]]>


Installation view of “Jesse Murry” at David Zwirner, New York

MARKING THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publish its first report on what would become AIDS, David Zwirner presents more life, a special series devoted to artists who died of HIV/AIDS-related illnesses during the first two decades of the epidemic.

Since June, the gallery has organized exhibitions by Jesse Murry, Marlon Riggs, Derek Jarman, Mark Morrisroe, Frank Moore, Ching Ho Cheng and the Silence=Death collective, which continue this fall.

The current show focuses on people born in North Carolina jesse murry (1948–1993). A painter and poet, Murry produced abstract paintings imbued with both drama and beauty, in which “the horizon was both its central image and its guiding ideal, as the moment when the near and the far, the inside and outside, self and other could be negotiated and reconciled.”

Painter and poet, Jesse Murry produced lyrical abstract paintings in which “the horizon was both his central image and guiding ideal, as the moment when near and far, inner and outer, self and the other could be negotiated and reconciled”.

At Sarah Lawrence College, Murry studied art and philosophy and after graduating in 1976 he moved to New York. During these early years he published essays on artists, was the guest curator of the exhibition “Currents: Reverend Howard Finster” at the New Museum, and taught art history and Hobart and William Smith colleges for two years, before enrolling as a graduate student at Yale University at age 36. Later he had his first solo exhibition in New York at the Sharpe Gallery (1987).

Seven paintings by Murry are on display at David Zwirner until October 23. The paintings were made between 1987 and 1992, during the last five years of the artist’s life as he dealt with his mortality.

“Jesse Murry: On the Rise” is co-curated by artist Lisa Yuskavage, who is represented by David Zwirner and has a simultaneous show at the gallery, and writer/curator Jarrett Earnest. Yuskavage attended Yale with Murry, where they both received their MFAs in 1986.

“I met Jesse during my interview at Yale. … He was the most erudite person I have ever met,” Yuskavage wrote in a memorial tribute to Murry. published in Art in Americaa in 2011. “He would come to my studio, and what he said about my work stays with me to this day.”

In a 1984 statement about his own work, Murry said, “If there is a general theme or idea concerning my work, beyond the enjoyment of color or form, it is to create a space in which the viewer can be as creative in watching as I am when I paint. There is plenty of room for the viewer to actively participate in their imagination, but initially they are gripped by color and its magical ability to shape a world. CT

IMAGES: Above, Installation view of ‘Jesse Murray: Rising’, David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street, New York, NY (September 17-October 23, 2021); Above left, Jesse Murry holding one of John Constable’s brushes, 1991. | Photo by Richard Constable. | Courtesy of David Zwirner

“Jesse Murray: Rising” is on view at David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street, New York, NY, Sept. 17-Oct. 23, 2021


JESSE MURRY, “Deluge—After Turner,” circa 1990-1991 (oil and wax on linen, 30 3/4 x 31 inches / 78.1 x 78.7 cm). | © The Estate of Jesse Murry. Courtesy The Estate of Jesse Murry and Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York


Installation view of ‘Jesse Murray: Rising’, David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street, New York, NY (September 17-October 23, 2021). | Courtesy of David Zwirner


JESSE MURRY, “Rising”, 1992 (oil and beeswax on canvas, 20 x 20 inches / 50.8 x 50.8 cm). | © The Estate of Jesse Murry. Courtesy The Estate of Jesse Murry and Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York


Installation view of ‘Jesse Murray: Rising’, David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street, New York, NY (September 17-October 23, 2021). | Courtesy of David Zwirner


JESSE MURRY, “Untitled”, 1991 (oil and wax on canvas, 48 ​​1/2 x 47 3/4 inches / 123.2 x 121.3 cm). | © The Estate of Jesse Murry. Courtesy The Estate of Jesse Murry and Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York


Installation view of ‘Jesse Murray: Rising’, David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street, New York, NY (September 17-October 23, 2021). | Courtesy of David Zwirner

READ MORE In 2019, the exhibition “Jesse Murry: Radical Loneliness” was exhibited at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York

BOOKSHELF
“Painting is Supreme Fiction: Writings of Jesse Murry, 1980-1993” is a new publication dedicated to the writings of artist Jesse Murry. Jarrett Earnest edited the volume and wrote the introduction. Hilton Als wrote the foreword. Content includes Murry’s critical writing and poetry, color plates of 16 paintings, and reproduced pages from two of his manuscript notebooks.

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Patrick McDonnell brings pandemic abstract paintings to comic book art https://cuimingda.com/patrick-mcdonnell-brings-pandemic-abstract-paintings-to-comic-book-art/ Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/patrick-mcdonnell-brings-pandemic-abstract-paintings-to-comic-book-art/ Patrick McDonnell is best known as the creator of pooches, a long-running, light-hearted daily comic starring Earl the dog and Mooch the cat. But occasionally since college, McDonnell has also done abstract paintings on the side, though he mostly kept the work to himself. Then in 2016, McDonnell presents his paintings to two friends: Nancy […]]]>

Patrick McDonnell is best known as the creator of pooches, a long-running, light-hearted daily comic starring Earl the dog and Mooch the cat. But occasionally since college, McDonnell has also done abstract paintings on the side, though he mostly kept the work to himself.

Then in 2016, McDonnell presents his paintings to two friends: Nancy and Sluggo, characters from the comic strip Nancy, originally written and drawn by Ernie Bushmiller (and these days by Olivia Jaimes). McDonnell added both figures directly to his canvases, usually depicting them from behind or in profile, where they became surrogate viewers of his paintings.

“Nancy and Sluggo have a surreal side to them, which is really nice. A lot of the jokes about Nancy and Sluggo are that they see weird things,” McDonnell recently said over the phone. [Bushmiller’s] work very closely and, boy, he draws the back of their heads looking at a lot of things. … So they have become good relays for my public.

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Mokoka Finds Solace in Abstract Paintings :: Mmegi Online https://cuimingda.com/mokoka-finds-solace-in-abstract-paintings-mmegi-online/ Sun, 08 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cuimingda.com/mokoka-finds-solace-in-abstract-paintings-mmegi-online/ Abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent an accurate representation of a visual reality, but rather uses shapes, colors, shapes, and gestural marks to achieve its effect. “I chose to specialize in abstract painting because I discovered that I could freely express my thoughts and emotions through it. There is nothing more […]]]>

Abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent an accurate representation of a visual reality, but rather uses shapes, colors, shapes, and gestural marks to achieve its effect. “I chose to specialize in abstract painting because I discovered that I could freely express my thoughts and emotions through it.

There is nothing more liberating and exciting than being able to experiment with painting while communicating your thoughts and emotions, which can be difficult to say out loud,” Mokoka told Arts & Culture in an interview. .

Mokoka has also said that he uses acrylic paints on canvas to create his works. She revealed that she learned abstract painting by watching international artists on YouTube and other social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram. “I pushed myself to learn more about abstract paintings because I didn’t dwell much on paintings in elementary and graduate school. I’ve been doing abstract paintings for a year and several months,” she said.

Additionally, she explained that most of her inspiration comes from how she feels, her life experiences, and the colors found in nature. She also explained that she didn’t have any particular piece of art that was her favorite. She believed that each work of art was unique, carried value and a piece of her soul.

Although abstract paintings are not popular in Botswana, Mokoka said she received good reviews from the public and potential clients who wanted to buy her work. She said she mostly paints intuitively without having an image or model to paint from. She added that the end results came from spontaneous play or experimentation with brushes, colors and textures.

Talking about the challenges she is facing, she said she has no place to sell her works at the moment but said she is currently advertising her works on her social media pages. Other challenges she has encountered include being unable to stay consistent with creating artwork due to long hours in the corporate sector. However, she said she tried to create works of art with every chance she had.

“As a newly arrived abstract artist, I am happy to have sold three paintings, especially during the pandemic. I have managed to exhibit some of my works in one of the best art galleries in Botswana, the Thapong Visual Arts Centre. I have goals that I have yet to meet such as organizing a solo exhibition planned for next year. My long term goal is to establish my own art gallery in Botswana and around the world.” she said.

Mokoka was born in 1997, she grew up in Selebi Phikwe and it was during her primary school years that she started doing Zentangle art. Looking back, she said her passion for art made her choose art as one of her subjects from elementary to high school. She said she did extremely well in the subject and won several awards. These awards included the Botswana National Art Fair for Secondary Schools where she won first place for her work Zentangle in 2013. Other awards include Best Student Art which she achieved in 2012 and 2013. However At the tertiary level, she took a different career path where she studied Bachelor of Information and Knowledge Management at the University of Botswana. She said it was on her third year of college when she decided to continue with art and major in abstract paintings.

For any request, she can be contacted @ Facebook: Amantle, Mokoka Art, Instagram:amantlemokoka_art, Twitter: AmantleM_Art. She is, however, in the process of creating an Amazon website for her works.

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